Degrees and Programs

International Business Concentration for Students Matriculated Before July 1, 2013

Feb. 2, 1993 — AOS Guidelines: Business, Management and Economics

The concentration in international business can build on a foundation of any of a number of different areas in business, management or economics, but must demonstrate an awareness of the extensive, complex, external environment in which internationally oriented businesses will operate. Also crucial is an awareness of the different cultural, political and legal environments in international business and the consequences of decisions made by managers operating in that context.

Empire State College offers the opportunity to complete a number of different concentrations in international business, including designing a program that is a variation of the traditional Bachelor of Science degree in business administration enhanced by studies dealing with problems of doing business internationally or in international trade and currency concerns. Other options include a program strongly focused on world geography, a program stressing the preparation for an international marketing or banking career, or one with a very strong basis of foreign language knowledge.

Because international business concentrations offer many diverse career opportunities, career exploration in the research phase of educational planning is particularly important. Career opportunities exist in private industry, commerce, government and banking. In some careers, specialized studies are desirable for employment (for example, banking or government work). However, for the majority of private-industry careers, specialized studies are not required. Instead, a basic program and then experience in the industry is helpful to career progression. Students should carefully consider their employment experiences and expectations in the design of their degree programs. These experiences can often be complemented or enhanced through individualized learning contracts which allow the student to pursue topics relevant to certain employment situations.

The guidelines that follow provide guidance to a basic program, which should be augmented with additional studies in areas that are relevant to the individual student.

The basic course of study outline for international business provided here is drawn from long-standing and widely accepted programs at other institutions.

Liberal Arts Studies That Should Be Included in All International Business Concentrations

For international business, a student is recommended to include studies in:

  • world history
  • U.S. history
  • political science (world governments and U.S. government)
  • comparative literatures or world literature
  • art history
  • world philosophies and religions
  • foreign language (with sufficient credits to reach at least an intermediate level of competency in a relevant foreign language).

Supporting Studies That Should Be Included in International Business Concentrations

For international business a student is recommended to include studies in:

  • economics (macro-micro)
  • business law
  • accounting/use of financial information
  • statistics
  • finance
  • computer science.

Specific Courses or Studies in International Business

Studies in the following are highly recommended:

  • theoretical background of international business
  • international marketing
  • cultural/political/legal/anthropological environments of international enterprises
  • international economics/finance
  • economic geography.

A Word About Concentration Titles

Students who elect to design degree programs typical of traditional business administration programs or traditional Bachelor of Science economics programs should select a degree program concentration title to reflect the traditional nature of their program. Some examples are: Bachelor of Science in international business or Bachelor of Science in international economics.

Students who elect to design a unique degree program which includes a combination of traditional studies in individualized studies or credit by evaluation should select concentration titles that reflect the essence of these degree programs as demonstrated in their degree program rationales. Some examples could be: international marketing, international banking and international economic development.