Educator Preparation Program Public Disclosure Page

2015-2016 Title II Alternative (Trans B) (PDF 212kB)

2015-2016 Title II Traditional (Residency) (PDF 200kB)

Title II

1) P-12 Student Learning

Case Studies Executive Summary

SUNY Empire State College's Educator Preparation Program (EPP) designed and implemented a case study pilot to demonstrate K-12 program impact in the 2016-2017 academic year. We used the demographic profiles provided by college's office of Decision Support to identify four recent Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program completers who represent each region of the state we serve as well as providing representation form the two tracks within the MAT program, the content areas included in the MAT program, gender, and types of schools where completers are employed (urban, rural, charter, and alternative). Participants include: a Transitional B Language Other Than English (LOTE) completer from the Transitional B program working as a professional development coach in an urban school, a Residency social studies completer working at a secondary school district that was specifically designed to educate at-risk students across 53 counties, a Residency completer who teaches secondary science at a long-time partner school that draws from a small village as well as a rural community, and a Transitional B completer from the Intensified Mentored Teaching (IMT) Track teaching high school English in the New York City School District. These four completers represent the total of the desired sample size.

The EPP collected data from three primary sources for the acquired sample – the results of the interview, the voluntarily supplied Annual Professional Performance Review (APPR) scores, and the completers' final observation report done by the EPP in the semester prior to graduation. Interviews were conducted with each of the four completers for supplemental, qualitative data consisting of three, open-ended questions:

What, if any, assignments from the MAT program do our completers draw on to document student growth?
How, if at all, does the MAT program contribute to completers use of critical pedagogy and culturally responsive teaching? Can they document the impact culturally responsive teaching strategies have on student growth?
How do classroom observations, as documented by the EPP's faculty compare to those done by the completer's first year employers as indicated by the EPP's final classroom observation and the first year HEDI scores?

All four subjects were rated Effective or Highly Effective on all categories of their APPRs. In addition, all four completers successfully completed their last Empire State College classroom observation (scores of applying, innovative or effective or highly effective, depending on which rubric each individual was rated).

With regards to information discovered through the interviews, all four completers mentioned MAT coursework they took at Empire State College for their essential, foundational knowledge in areas including cultural competence and assessment.

The results of this pilot demonstrate that our EPP has produced effective teachers who make positive impact on their own students.

The EPP faculty continues to analyze the results of this case study for modifications and trends that extends completers' impact on learning in grades 7-12 beyond the four program completers represented in this pilot study. Commonalities across the four completers are being teased out from particulars specific to individual completers. We plan to learn from this pilot and conduct additional case studies in the spring of 2018. Methodology will include:

  • Interviewing the completers' current supervisor
  • Having a clinical faculty member conduct an observation of the completer
  • Acquire their APPR score
  • Ask them to administer a student perception survey.

2) Observations of Teaching

Field supervisors observe our MAT students at least 10 times over the course of a clinical school year for both the Residency and Transitional B pathways. Based on the internal audit conducted by the program, there is 100% compliance in collecting and storing the rubrics for these observations.

Classroom Observation Rubric (COR)

Last two observations of Transitional B pathway MAT students

   

2014 SP1 Total

2015 SP1 Total

2016 SP1 Total

Program

No.

Item

Valid N

Mean

Valid N

Mean

Valid N

Mean

Adolescence Education: Trans B

MTPL1a

Creates an environment of respect and rapport

26

3.62

16

3.50

12

3.42

MTPL1b

Establishes a culture for learning by stressing the importance of content and learning

26

3.42

16

3.25

12

3.33

MTPL1c

Establishes a culture for learning by exhibiting expectations for learning and achievement.

26

3.31

16

3.25

12

3.42

MTPL2a

Demonstrates knowledge of content and the structure of the discipline

26

3.50

16

3.25

12

3.50

MTPL2b

Demonstrates knowledge of content-related pedagogy

26

3.35

16

3.06

12

3.25

MTPL3a

Sets meaningful  instructional outcomes

26

3.38

16

3.06

12

3.25

MTPL3b

Designs coherent instruction that is differentiated for diverse students

25

3.28

16

3.00

11

3.27

MTPL3c

Engages all students in learning using a variety of methods that include questioning & discussion prompts when appropriate.

26

3.23

16

3.19

12

2.92

MTPL4a

Demonstrates knowledge of students

26

3.42

14

3.29

12

3.50

MTPL4b

Communicates with students and families

24

3.38

14

3.29

12

3.50

MTPL5a

Designs assessments congruent with standards and instructional outcomes.

26

3.35

15

3.00

12

3.08

MTPL5b

Uses formative assessments and aligns results with planning.

26

3.31

16

3.13

12

3.17

MTPL5c

Provides opportunities for student self-assessment and monitoring of progress.

22

3.18

14

3.07

10

3.30

MTPL6a

Manages instructional groups, transitions, and other classroom procedures (e.g., materials, supplies)

26

3.46

16

3.25

12

3.50

MTPL6b

Has a clear response to student misbehavior.

24

3.38

13

3.08

10

3.50

MTPL6c

Demonstrates an ability to monitor student behavior (e.g., “withitness”)

25

3.40

16

3.19

12

3.58

MTPL7a

Exhibits professional growth and development by enhancing content knowledge and pedagogical skill.

18

3.67

13

3.46

11

3.36

MTPL7b

Exhibits professionalism in decision-making, ethical conduct and integrity.

16

3.25

12

3.00

8

3.63

 

Middle Childhood Ed:Trans B

MTPL1a

Creates an environment of respect and rapport

2

4.00

2

3.00

4

3.75

MTPL1b

Establishes a culture for learning by stressing the importance of content and learning

2

4.00

2

3.50

4

3.25

MTPL1c

Establishes a culture for learning by exhibiting expectations for learning and achievement.

2

4.00

2

3.00

4

3.75

MTPL2a

Demonstrates knowledge of content and the structure of the discipline

2

3.50

2

3.00

4

3.50

MTPL2b

Demonstrates knowledge of content-related pedagogy

2

3.00

2

3.50

4

3.50

MTPL3a

Sets meaningful  instructional outcomes

2

3.00

2

3.00

4

3.50

MTPL3b

Designs coherent instruction that is differentiated for diverse students

2

3.50

1

3.00

4

3.25

MTPL3c

Engages all students in learning using a variety of methods that include questioning & discussion prompts when appropriate.

2

3.50

2

3.00

4

3.50

MTPL4a

Demonstrates knowledge of students

2

3.00

2

3.00

4

3.75

MTPL4b

Communicates with students and families

2

3.50

2

3.00

3

3.33

MTPL5a

Designs assessments congruent with standards and instructional outcomes.

2

3.00

2

3.00

4

3.00

MTPL5b

Uses formative assessments and aligns results with planning.

2

3.50

2

3.00

4

3.00

MTPL5c

Provides opportunities for student self-assessment and monitoring of progress.

2

3.00

2

3.00

4

3.25

MTPL6a

Manages instructional groups, transitions, and other classroom procedures (e.g., materials, supplies)

2

4.00

2

3.50

4

2.75

MTPL6b

Has a clear response to student misbehavior.

1

4.00

2

3.00

3

3.00

MTPL6c

Demonstrates an ability to monitor student behavior (e.g., “withitness”)

2

4.00

2

3.50

4

3.25

MTPL7a

Exhibits professional growth and development by enhancing content knowledge and pedagogical skill.

1

4.00

2

3.50

4

3.50

MTPL7b

Exhibits professionalism in decision-making, ethical conduct and integrity.

2

3.50

1

3.00

4

3.50

Mean is based on a 1 to 4 scale where 1=Ineffective, 2=Developing, 3=Effective, and 4=Highly Effective; percentages do not include ratings of NA (not applicable); valid cases included in this analysis met the following criteria: 1) the teacher observed went on to graduate from the MAT program, 2) the observation took place in spring 2014, spring 2015, or spring 2016, 3) the teacher was observed as part of their participation in MATP course, and 4) the observation was either the teacher's last or next to last observation in the course

Residency Observation Rubric (ROR)

Last two observations of Residency pathway MAT students

   

2014 SP1 Total

2015 SP1 Total

2016 SP1 Total

Program

No.

Item

Valid N

Mean

Valid N

Mean

Valid N

Mean

Master of Arts in Teaching-Adolescence Education

ResPL1_1.1

Providing clear learning goals and scales to measure those goals (e.g., the resident provides or reminds students about a specific learning goal.)

20

2.90

24

3.00

26

3.35

ResPL2_1.2

Celebrating student success and effort

19

3.16

24

3.17

25

3.20

ResPL3_1.3

When applicable, providing students with choices within the lesson framework, including but not limited to formative and summative assessment measures

15

2.67

20

3.00

19

3.26

ResPL4_2.1

Identifying critical information (e.g., the resident provides cues as to which information is important)

20

2.95

24

3.04

26

3.19

ResPL5_2.2

Organizing students to interact with new knowledge (e.g., the resident organizes students into cooperative groups/pairs to discuss small chunks of content).

15

3.07

21

2.86

22

3.32

ResPL6_2.3

Reviewing content (e.g., the resident uses strategies such as K-W-L, advance organizers, preview questions…)

20

2.85

22

3.09

25

3.20

ResPL7_2.4

Chunking content into “digestible bites” (e.g., the resident presents content in small portions that are tailored to the students' level of understanding)

20

2.90

23

3.04

25

3.32

ResPL8_2.5

Elaborating on new information (e.g., the resident asks questions that require students to make and defend inferences)

19

2.79

20

3.00

22

3.27

ResPL9_2.6

Recording and representing knowledge (e.g., the resident asks students to elaborate on and clarify new information)

19

3.00

21

3.00

25

3.20

ResPL10_2.7

Reflecting on learning (e.g. the resident asks students to reflect on what they understand or what they are confused about)

20

3.00

24

2.96

24

3.25

ResPL11_3.1

Examining similarities and differences (e.g., the resident engages students in comparing, classifying, and creating analogies and metaphors)

19

2.79

21

3.00

22

3.36

ResPL12_3.2

Organizing students to practice and deepen knowledge (e.g., the resident organizes students into groups designed to review information or practice skills

15

3.00

20

2.95

20

3.30

ResPL13_3.3

Examining errors in reasoning (e.g., the resident asks students to examine fallacies, propaganda, and bias)

18

3.11

11

2.91

19

3.21

ResPL14_3.4

Using formative assessment strategies throughout the lesson to assess understanding and application of new knowledge.

20

2.75

24

3.00

24

3.21

ResPL15_3.5

Demonstrating the use of both formative and summative assessment data to inform lesson planning and classroom decision making

20

2.80

20

3.05

21

3.14

ResPL16_4.1

Engaging students in cognitively complex tasks involving hypothesis generating and testing (e.g., the resident engages students in decision-making tasks, problem-solving tasks, experimental inquiry tasks, and investigation tasks)

18

3.11

20

3.00

22

3.45

ResPL17_4.2

Providing resources, guidance, and modeling for students to complete tasks.

20

3.15

22

3.09

26

3.35

ResPL18_5.1

Noticing and reacting when students are not engaged (e.g., the resident scans the classroom to monitor students' level of engagement)

19

3.00

22

2.77

22

3.32

ResPL19_5.2

Using academic games and/or technology to engage students and enrich learning

17

3.00

20

3.00

21

3.33

ResPL20_5.3

Manages response rates during questioning (e.g., the resident uses strategies to ensure that multiple students respond to questions such as response cards, response chaining, and voting technologies)

18

3.11

23

2.70

23

3.17

ResPL21_5.4

Using physical movements

19

3.16

23

3.17

25

3.28

ResPL22_5.5

Maintaining a lively pace (e.g., the resident slows and quickens the pace of instruction in such a way as to enhance learning)

18

3.11

24

3.00

25

3.28

ResPL23_5.6

Demonstrating intensity and enthusiasm (e.g., the resident uses verbal and nonverbal signals that he or she is enthusiastic about the content.

20

3.10

22

3.36

25

3.32

ResPL24_5.7

Providing opportunities for students to relate content to their personal lives and interests.

18

2.89

16

2.94

24

3.21

ResPL25_5.8

Presenting unusual or intriguing information (e.g., the resident provides or encourages the identification of intriguing information about the content.)

18

2.78

15

3.13

22

3.23

ResPL26_5.9

Providing opportunities for students to set personal educational goals as well as encouragement and scaffolding to help students achieve their personal educational goals

16

2.69

19

3.16

22

3.18

ResPL27_6.1

Demonstrating “withitness” (e.g., the resident is aware of variations in student behavior that might indicate potential disruptions and attends to them immediately).

19

3.00

21

2.95

23

3.30

ResPL28_6.2

Applying consequences (e.g., the resident applies consequences for lack of adherence to rules and procedures fairly and consistently)

10

2.80

12

3.17

13

3.15

ResPL29_6.3

Acknowledging adherence to rules and procedures (e.g., the resident acknowledges adherence to rules and procedures consistently and fairly)

13

2.85

13

3.15

21

3.19

ResPL30_7.1

Understanding students' interests and backgrounds (e.g., the resident seeks out knowledge about the students and uses that knowledge to engage in informal, friendly discussions with students)

19

3.21

20

3.50

23

3.17

ResPL31_7.2

Displaying objectivity and control (e.g., the resident behaves in ways that indicate he or she does not take infractions personally)

18

3.00

23

3.48

22

3.32

ResPL32_8.1

Demonstrating value and respect for all students and  holding high expectations for all students

20

3.20

24

3.42

26

3.35

ResPL33_8.2

Asking questions and probing incorrect answers with depth and rigor

20

2.85

24

3.00

25

3.24

Mean scores based on a 0 to 4 scale where 0=Not Using, 1=Beginning, 2=Developing, 3=Applying, and 4=Innovating; percentages do not include ratings of NA (not applicable); valid cases included in this analysis met the following criteria: 1) the teacher observed went on to graduate from the MAT program, 2) the observation took place in spring 2014, spring 2015, or spring 2016, 3) the teacher was observed as part of their participation in the Residency Seminar Two course, and 4) the observation was either the teacher's last or next to last observation in the course.

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