Management Concentration for Students Matriculated Effective Sept. 3, 2014

Overview

The management concentration prepares students with the competitive knowledge and skills necessary in for-profit and nonprofit organizations, to achieve success in their professional careers and to advance to graduate studies. The concentration’s course work is fully aligned with SUNY’s general education curriculum, resulting in graduates who are able to draw upon a foundation in the liberal arts, as well as business courses. Fulfillment of the SUNY general education requirements will provide both breadth of learning and a solid foundation in disciplinary theory.

Additionally, the concentration is fully integrated within the Business, Management and Economics area of study guidelines. These guidelines support an understanding of communication skills, information management, economics, ethical and social responsibility, quantitative skills and an understanding of people and organizational contexts.

Together, these concepts and frameworks may prove helpful in understanding and applying organizational and management theory and practices. Supported by an outstanding faculty who draw upon decades of academic and business experience, the concentration combines academic rigor and experiential applications in developing essential leadership and management knowledge and skills.

Managers filling a variety of roles and functions coordinate human, physical and financial resources to accomplish organizational goals. Processes such as decision making are essential in all forms of organizations, including businesses, government agencies and nonprofit groups. Since managers work with individuals, small groups and whole organizations, students developing a concentration in management will benefit from giving special attention to human behavior, including behavior grounded in cultures other than their own. Managers have to understand systems, morality, people and geography. Increasing globalization requires additional capacity and understanding of the complexities of working in a global environment.

The rapid evolution in management knowledge has enhanced organizations’ effective marshaling of human, physical and financial resources in widely distributed geographical locations. In light of changes in the environments in which both public as well as private-sector organizations operate, students must understand such factors as technology, ethics, globalization, sustainability and diversity.

Organization of the Concentration

The management concentration is organized around a core of recommended knowledge and skills that can be demonstrated through studies, course work and/or prior learning assessment. The concentration encompasses a wide range of topics within the fields of management history and theory, the social sciences, quantitative and analytical business skills, globalization, leadership, organizational behavior, human resources and strategic management. A well-designed, comprehensive degree program will, in turn, address each of these through the key learning outcomes. A capstone study, while not required, will help provide the student with the opportunity to synthesize several different studies into a final learning experience.

Learning Outcomes

Broad-based Knowledge of Management Fundamentals

Students will demonstrate the ability to identify, analyze, understand and resolve management-related issues or challenges by integrating a foundation in the liberal arts with knowledge of management theory, history and practice while examining management from individual, institutional and societal perspectives. Examples of relevant subjects would include fundamentals of management, principles of management, history of management, management theory, leadership theory and managerial leadership. The exact studies a student may elect will vary according to the relevance of the course to a particular degree program and more than one course may be required to provide sufficient knowledge in this topic.

Specific Knowledge of Management Practice

Students will define, differentiate and properly understand management roles, functions, methods, processes and technologies while demonstrating the ability to apply them to a variety of organizations in local and global-management contexts. Examples of relevant subjects would include accounting, finance, marketing, leadership theory, managerial leadership, operations management and project management. The exact studies a student may elect will vary according to the relevance of the course to a particular degree program and more than one course may be required to provide sufficient knowledge in this topic.

Critical Thinking and Applied Learning Skills

Students will construct coherent and viable positions based on an understanding of best management practices and principles; conceptualize, design and communicate the effective use of the management function in support of organizational development in highly competitive, diverse markets. Examples of relevant subjects would include organizational behavior, psychology, statistics and studies in human resources management. The exact studies a student may elect will vary according to the relevance of the course to a particular degree program and more than one course may be required to provide sufficient knowledge in this topic.

Ethical and Globally Responsible Learning

Students will develop an understanding of justice, equality, sustainability and the importance of becoming ethical, morally responsible and effective business leaders and of the cultural and ethical complexities of conducting business on a global scale, while developing the skills and perspective needed for effective leadership in a multicultural environment. Examples of relevant subjects would include studies in business ethics, cross-cultural management, diversity, globalization and international business. The exact studies a student may elect will vary according to the relevance of the course to a particular degree program and more than one course may be required to provide sufficient knowledge in this topic.

Capstone Study

While not required, a capstone study will provide the student with the opportunity to synthesize several different studies into a final learning experience. Examples of capstone studies include strategic management, small business management, organizational development and change, or nonprofit management. The exact capstone study a student may elect will vary according to the relevance of the study to a particular degree program.

Take the Next Step

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