Take a Course this Fall

Take a course this fall and earn some college credit. SUNY Empire State College Online Fall 8-week accelerated session offers some of our most popular undergraduate courses.

Fall Session D courses begin October 26 and end December 18.

Start now and enroll as a nondegree, undergraduate student.

Register by Oct. 22, 2020



ACCT 2005

Introductory Accounting I

The objective of this study is to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of financial accounting systems and principles, including financial statements preparation, interpretation and communication to external parties and managers.  Among topics covered are: the accounting cycle for gathering, recording, summarizing, reporting and analyzing of accounting data.  The course includes an overview of accounting for assets, liabilities, stockholders' equity, revenues and expenses including cash, investments, accounts receivable, inventories, plant assets and equipment, intangible assets and natural resources, short and long term liabilities, in addition to basic principles of internal control and the role of ethics in accounting profession. This course covers professional ethics and social responsibility in business.

Notes: Students cannot count the credit for Accounting for Decision Makers  (ACCT_1005) in their degree plan if they also take Introductory Accounting I (ACCT_2005) 'Financial' and/or Introductory Accounting II (ACCT_2010) 'Managerial', since the course contents are similar. The course satisfies quantitative aspects of business.

This course was previously BME-212054  Introductory Accounting 1.

ARTS 4010

Art History: Study of Cultures

This course is designed to cultivate skills for constructing a lens on history and culture out of a web of artists, artworks and artistic practices. It aims to connect artistic practices not only with questions of beauty and form, but also with the shifts of time, socio-cultural context, wealth, spiritual attitudes and power. Through examining artists, artworks, art movements, artistic mediums, and art theories, students learn to understand and interpret social attitudes, values and beliefs, as well as aesthetic trends and customs in different eras and locales. Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Upper-level standing with advanced level academic skills.

Highly Recommended (not required): A lower-level art history class is recommended. This course was previously ART-223514 Art History: A Study of Cultures.

BIOL 1210

Biology I

Biology I is the first course of a two-term sequence in general biology for science concentrations. This three-credit course covers the lecture and not the laboratory component of the sequence, which is offered as a separate course. Students will learn the basic principles of cellular and molecular biology, importance of the scientific method, definitions and characteristics of life, and evolutionary principles. Lecture topics include: basic biochemistry; cell structure; membrane structure and function; cellular respiration and photosynthesis; cell communication; the cell cycle; meiosis; the chromosomal and molecular basis of inheritance; gene expression; the biology of viruses; and biotechnology. This lecture course complements the lab component covered in Biology I Laboratory, but it is not a co-requisite to the lab.

BIOL 1211

Biology I Laboratory

This is a one-credit laboratory course that supports the Biology I course.

BIOL 1212

Biology II

Biology II is the second course of a two-term sequence in general biology for science concentrations. This three-credit course covers the lecture and not the laboratory component of the sequence, which is offered as a separate course. Students will learn the basic principles of biology, primarily in the domain of microbial, plant and animal biology. Lecture topics include: biological diversity; plant form and function; animal form and function, including digestion, respiration, immune responses, excretion, endocrinology, reproduction, and neurology. The study of life forms is presented in the context of the principles of evolution and ecology and emphasizes the importance of interactions among organisms. This lecture course complements the lab component covered in Biology II Laboratory, but it is not a co-requisite to the lab.

Prerequisites: Biology I or Introduction to Cell Biology and Genetics, or equivalent.

BIOL 1213

Biology II Laboratory

This is a one-credit laboratory course that supports the Biology II course. Students will learn basic knowledge of microbiology and plant and animal biology through laboratory exercises. Dissection techniques are explained and used to compare a variety of life forms and their internal anatomy. Laboratory topics include: the biological diversity of bacteria, archaea, protists, and fungi; plant form and function; and animal form and function. Life forms are compared and contrasted in the context of the principles of evolutionary adaptation. This laboratory course complements the lecture component covered in Biology II, but it is not a co-requisite to the lecture.

Prerequisites: Biology I or Introduction to Cell Biology and Genetics, or equivalent.

BIOL 3204

Genetics

This advanced level course explores the field of genetics. It expands on topics covered in introductory biology courses and extends prior knowledge of molecular genetics and the basic principles of heredity. The course emphasizes the importance of the scientific method, and investigates techniques used by scientists to unravel the intricacies of genetics. Topics include the history of genetics, Mendelian genetic principles, quantitative genetics, chromosome structure and mapping, mutations, gene expression, and current genetic biotechnologies. Students will learn the underlying principles behind modern genetics laboratory techniques and discuss the ethical ramifications of recent breakthroughs in genetic research.

Prerequisites (must complete before registering): Biology I with Lab (BIOL_1200) or Introduction to Cell Biology and Genetics (BIOL_1204), or equivalent and Biology II with Lab (BIOL_1201) or the two-term sequence: Introduction to Organismal Biology (BIOL_1205) and Introduction to Population Biology(BIOL_1206), or equivalent.

Note: This course meets the guidelines for Biology concentrations. This course was previously SMT-273384 Genetics.

BUSN 1015

Introduction to Business

This course is designed to serve generally as a first business class to be taken by students in business and related concentrations. Its main objective is to provide a brief overview of the basic concepts and principles of contemporary business topics such as business ethics, economics, e-business, management, marketing, accounting, and finance.

BUSN 3122

Management Info Systems

In this course, students explore the impact of advances in information technology in the context of organizational decision making and the potential of an effective management information system to contribute to organizational learning, to be a source of competitive advantage, and to assist an organization competing in a global arena. By exploring systems from a managerial and organizational perspective, students will develop the capacity to examine the interactions among people, technology, and processes and recommend solutions to complex business problems.

Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Principles of Management (MGMT_1005), or equivalent.

Highly Recommended (not required): Students should have a basic understanding of computers along with a fundamental understanding of computer use in an organizational environment. In addition, students should have an understanding of basic management principles. This can be gained through a course such as Management Principles or equivalent knowledge through professional experience.

This course was previously SMT-273754 Management Information Systems.

CHFS 3022

Counseling Children & Adolescent

In this study students will explore the various theories, models, and treatment approaches for working with children and adolescents who are in need of counseling. Students will learn techniques that helping professionals use for assessment, engagement, and intervention. An important part of this study is examining counseling children and adolescents in various social and cultural contexts. This course aligns with the Community and Human Services area of study guidelines for Knowledge of Human Behavior, Skills, and Application and Integration.

Course previously CHS-253414

CRJS 4025

Police Community Relations

This course focuses on the relationship between police and the community with recommendations for ways of working together to reduce crime. Emphasis is placed on policing in a culturally-diverse society.

DIGA 3040

Digital Storytelling

Digital Storytelling combines storytelling arts with social, mobile, and digital media technologies. Learn to apply digital storytelling theory and techniques to write, produce and publish digital stories, including autobiographical narratives, mobile stories, and a collaborative digital story. Consider ethical issues such as intellectual property, privacy protection and the rights of storytelling subjects. In this course, you’ll generate story ideas, develop narrative structures for digital stories, and provide scripts and scene descriptions. Selecting different digital tools, you’ll integrate images, text, video and audio to create digital stories, and acquire competency in the use of digital media applications.

Prerequisites: Students taking the course must have access to digital devices (such as a desktop computer, laptop, tablet or smartphone, headset or USB microphone) allowing them to take photographs, record audio and video, edit digital assets within the applications of their choice, and upload these to their story blog or the course. They will be expected to research and select digital applications, create accounts to access free or low cost tools, and use tutorials and other digital resources to learn them. Ideally digital media arts or digital art and design students take Digital Storytelling before Media Arts.

This course was previously ART-223054 Digital Storytelling.

ECON 2015

Macroeconomics

This course provides a comprehensive overview of macroeconomic issues. The determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation are studied. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed. Important policy debates such as, the sub-prime crisis, social security, the public debt, and international economic issues are critically explored. The course introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles with the experience of the U.S. and foreign economies.

Corequisites: Microeconomics (ECON_2020)

Notes : Macroeconomics focuses on the working of the overall economy whereas Microeconomics emphasizes the behavior of individual actors, such as firms and households, under various constraints. This 4-credit Macroeconomics course covers a broader array of macroeconomic topics than are included in the 4 and 6 credit courses that cover both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Intermediate Macroeconomics provides a deeper analysis of different macroeconomic models. International Finance provides a focus on the international aspects of the economic system, whilst Money & Banking involves a more detailed examination of the role of the banking system and money creation in a modern economy. Other specialized courses may examine the functioning of specific sectors as well as the gender and environmental aspects of environmental decision making. This course was previously BME-212214 Economics/Macro.

ECON 2020

Microeconomics

This course provides a comprehensive overview of microeconomic issues. Supply, demand and elasticity are studied. Consumer behavior and firm behavior are investigated. The basics of competitive markets, monopoly and other market structures are examined. Market failures including public goods and externalities are studied as well as public policies aimed at improving these market failures. The course introduces basic models of microeconomics and illustrates microeconomic principles with examples from everyday experience.

Corequisite (must be taken concurrently): Macroeconomics (ECON_2015) Notes: Microeconomics emphasizes the behavior under various constraints of individual actors, such as firms and households. Macroeconomics focuses on the working of the overall or aggregate economy. This 4-credit Microeconomics course covers a broader array of microeconomic topics than are included in the 4 and 6 credit courses that cover both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Intermediate Microeconomics provides a deeper analysis of different microeconomic theories and models. Other specialized courses such as Labor Economics and Environmental Economics and Policy may examine the functioning of specific sectors as well as the gender and environmental aspects of environmental decision making.

This course was previously BME-212224 Economics/Micro."

EDST 1005

Introduction to Teaching

Explore the opportunities to work with children in the field of early childhood education. Students will explore child care credentialing, professionalism, ethics, and the foundations of teaching and learning in formal and informal child care settings. The course places emphasis on ways to enhance development and learning through an environment and curriculum that supports young children and families.

Please note: This course may be used for educational planning credit with mentor approval.

This course was previously EDU-232422 Exploring the Professions: Children and Child Care.

EDST 3040

Learning Styles

The purpose of the course is for the learner to understand how diverse learning styles impact the life of others as well as their own life. The concept 'learning styles' is a broad frame within which to include diverse paradigms for different ways of knowing. Learners will analyze learning style concepts from Western, Eastern, and Indigenous learning styles as well as learning styles within different learning contexts.

Please note: This course does not meet the area of study guideline for learning theories.

Please note: This course may be used for educational planning credit with mentor approval.

This course was previously EDU-233222 Learning Styles.

HIST 1045

Arab Israeli Conflict

The student will study the basic historical contours of the Arab-Israeli conflict starting in the nineteenth century, but with a particular focus on the period since the founding of the state of Israel in 1948 up to the present day. The student will examine the economic, political, military, and religious perspectives of Israeli Jews and Palestinian Arabs.

HIST 2013

Race in US Politics

The student will examine the issue of race in contemporary US politics. Students will examine issues relating to white supremacy/white nationalism, immigration and demographic/cultural change, and how racial resentments connect to economic issues, among others. Students will explore how these issues affect electoral politics, campaigns, and how office-holders govern. We will learn how politicians and partisan media use these issues to move public opinion, and how mainstream media cover these issues.

This course is cross listed with POLI 2013.

HIST 2030

US History 1865 to Present

In 1865, the United States was in tatters. Civil War had divided the nation into two, and even after the war ended, deep rifts remained between whites and blacks, immigrants and 'natives,' and the descendants of European settlers and indigenous Americans. The meaning of a simple word - freedom - lies at the core of these rifts and that word will guide our study. The course begins with a look at how the meaning of freedom changed in the Reconstruction era before moving into an exploration of America’s westward and overseas expansion in the late 19th century, the economic booms and busts of the period between the two world wars, the social upheavals of the civil rights movements of the 1960s, and the conservative turn of the post-Reagan era.

This course was previously HIS-241224 U.S. History From 1865 to the Present."

HIST 3670

Barack Obama & His Presidency

The student will study the presidency of Barack Obama and the United States as a society from 2009 to the present. The student will gain an understanding of Barack Obama's approach to governance and his political/ideological beliefs, along with the intellectual and cultural context out of which Obama developed those beliefs. There will be a particular focus on Obama's conception of ethnic/racial identity as well as American national identity and how these ideas inform his broader worldview. The student will also gain an understanding of the major political, social, cultural, and economic issues of the time period under study.

HIST 3720

The Holocaust

The student will study the Holocaust in order to gain some insight into the reasons--historical, cultural, institutional, political--why human beings committed these atrocities against other human beings, as well as the mechanism by which the perpetrators carried them out. The student will also study the broader history of modern Germany to put the Holocaust in context.

HLHS 3015

Grief & Loss

This course explores the processes of loss and grief, various types of loss, including the experiences of those who have lost loved ones. Theories and research on the grieving process will be a focus of the course, and other topics may include: the roles of ritual, faith, and remembrance in grieving; cultural factors that contribute to reactions to loss; determining when grief becomes dysfunctional; and effective strategies for intervening with an individual who has experienced a significant loss.

Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 1005) or Introduction to Human Services (LABR 1165), or equivalent

Note: This course is aligned with the Community and Human Services area of study guidelines for Knowledge of Human Behavior and Skills.

This course was previously CHS-254044 Grief and Loss.

HUDV 3025

Human Development: Adv

In this course the student will examine a variety of theoretical viewpoints on human developmental process, as well as current research and studies of the principal topics of developmental psychology. Topics covered in this study may include: the impact on development of the continuing interaction between genetic and environmental factors, the growing body of knowledge about how children learn language and develop cognitive and social skills, and a discussion of prominent theorists in the field. Additionally lifespan theories like Erikson and Levinson may be emphasized, and focus on stages of adult development will be included, in addition to death and dying potentially being covered. Please note: Students are advised to consult with their mentor prior to enrolling in an introductory and an advanced level of the same or similar course title (e.g. Human Development: Introductory and Human Development: Advanced) as there can be significant redundancy in the content of developmental courses.

HUDV 3055

Developmental Neurobiology

This course looks at the interaction between the development of internal (neurological) and external (behavior) processes across the lifespan. Topics may include how brain development and the environment interact, how the brain changes throughout development, and how the brain and behavior are related at different points throughout the lifespan. The study will include how the development of the neurological system reflects individual variation in development at different stages in the lifecycle.

While not required, it might be helpful if students had Human Development, Human Biology, or equivalent courses.

This course was previously HDV-283112."

HUSV 2035

Introduction to Human Services

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an overview of the field of human services. The student will have the opportunity to examine the roles and responsibilities of human service professionals. The study will explore the organizational structures and range of services in the field. The foundational knowledge of the field, introduction to basic skills, and strategies used will be introduced. Ethical principles and the core values necessary for working in the field of human services will be explored. This course is aligned with the Community and Human Services Area of Study guidelines for Knowledge of Service Delivery, Skills, Ethics, and Application and Integration. This course is aligned with the BS in Addiction Studies program guidelines for Skills, Ethics, and Application and Integration.

This course was previously CHS-252094 Introduction to Human Services.

HUSV 3122

Conflict in Human Services

The student will explore theory related to conflict, mediation and negotiation and how it may be applied to the human service setting. The student will learn more about specific approaches useful for one-on-one to helping situations as well as strategies for understanding and managing conflict in the organizational setting. The student will consider his or her own conflict style and learn how to assess conflict. The student will do research on a specific area of interest (e.g. transformative mediation) related to a resolution process. This course is aligned with the Community and Human Services area of study guidelines for skills.

INFS 3010

Database Systems

This course covers the design and development of databases that support the activities of an organization. Data modeling and the implementation of data models will be a major component of the course, with students studying normalization and formal modeling conventions. The model will be implemented using SQL. Metadata is also covered as well as some aspects of database administration.

Prerequisites (must complete before registering): A basic understanding of databases such as that covered by Introduction to Data Management Tools (INFS 2010), Introduction to Database Design (CSCI 1015), or equivalent database knowledge.

Assumptions about surrounding courses: Knowledge of systems analysis and design is helpful but not required. A background in logic such as that gained in Discrete Mathematics is helpful but not required.

Notes: Some sections of this course will use an Oracle DBMS and/or modeling tools such as Microsoft Visio.

This course was previously SMT-273984 Database Systems.

INFT 3015

Communication Tech Convergence

The current technological mantra for businesses is convergence of communication systems. Legacy communication systems, such as voice, data and video networks of today, are being converged into a single network. This course will examine the history, business aspects and operation of current legacy systems with a strong focus on the drivers of network convergence and the emerging manifestations of convergence. This course will include a case study and many other activities that will provide the student with a realistic view of current trends and the ability to extrapolate this trend into the future.

Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Introduction to Networks or equivalent Assumptions about surrounding courses: Familiarity with the core concepts of networking, including awareness of the existence of protocols; an understanding of hardware such as routers and hubs and switches, common operating systems, basic systems and network security. This knowledge can be gained through the listed prerequisite course or through professional experience.

This course was previously SMT-273334 Communications Technology Convergence.

INFT 3050

Systems Analysis & Design

The focus of this course is to enable the IT professional to use the appropriate logical and design processes to develop useful and useable business information systems. The course will incorporate general systems theory and development methodologies, and may use business case studies to explore the implementation of these concepts. This course is appropriate for IT professionals seeking to supplement or upgrade their skill sets and students with an information systems background but with no systems analysis and design expertise.

Assumptions about surrounding courses: Some programming experience. Work in some aspect of information systems or an introductory information systems course. Students will be expected to install and use Microsoft Visio on their computers. While this course includes user interface design, it does not cover sufficient material to address Human-Computer Interaction.

This course was previously SMT-273224 Systems Analysis and Design.

INFT 4005

Busn Cont Plan & Dis Recvry

Organizations must plan for contingencies. Business continuity planning and disaster recovery must start long before a catastrophe strikes. Electronic/digital processes are ubiquitous and at the core of many business functions, so no longer is restoration of a centralized data center sufficient. While the work is often rooted in IT, the entire organization must be considered. Thus, it is important to learn to analyze organizations; identify risk and impact; understand complexity; identify mission-critical systems; communicate the need for planning; create, test and implement business continuity plans; and conduct disaster avoidance.

Prerequisites: Management Principles or equivalent

Assumptions about surrounding courses: Familiarity with the functions of management including planning, organizing, staffing, leading, and controlling (such as one should gain through the listed prerequisite course or through professional experience). Students must also have the ability to do academic research using the college library, evaluate material, and effectively communicate ideas in an academic format (such as one should develop through lower- level college studies).

This course was previously SMT-274604 Business Continuity Planning and Disaster Recovery.

INFT 4015

Information Assurance

This course focuses on the managerial aspects of information security and assurance. Topics covered include access control models, information security governance, and information security program assessment and metrics. Coverage on the foundational and technical components of information security is included to reinforce key concepts. The course includes up-to-date information on changes in the field, such as national and international laws and international standards like the ISO 27000 series. The course covers topics such as Introduction to the Management of Information Security, Planning for Security and Contingencies, Information Security, Security Management, Risk Management, and Law and Ethics.

Prerequisites: Data Communications and Networks or equivalent; Database Systems or equivalent; Web Systems Development or equivalent.

Highly Recommended (not required): An understanding of data communications and computer network models (such as one would gain in an upper-level networking study), database systems and database administration concepts (such as one would gain in a database study), and web technologies and related applications (such as one would gain in a web systems study).

This course was previously SMT-273494 Information Assurance.

MATH 1030

Visualizing Mathematics

Are you a visual learner? This course will give an opportunity to learn mathematics primarily through seeing it. Focus will be on topics in geometry, which are naturally visual, and graphing, which will give an understanding of the visual aspect of algebra. The course will also look at mathematics through art. DVDs and text materials will be used, along with internet resources.

Note: This study is appropriate for students who need general education credit in mathematics.

This course was previously SMT-271514 Visualizing Mathematics.

MATH 1040

Algebra

This study will develop basic algebra concepts and problem solving techniques. The student will develop skills in translating problem situations into their symbolic representations and manipulating those symbols. Major topics include equations, inequalities, problem solving, geometry, graphs, and transformations. Linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions will be studied.

Note: This study is appropriate for students who need general education credit in mathematics.

Prerequisite: Understanding of arithmetic essentials. This course was previously SMT-271104 Algebra.

MATH 1050

Mathematics for Business

Mathematics for Business presents math skills and knowledge that can be applied in solving financial problems. The core topics include business finance, trade and cash discounts, markup and markdown, business statistics, wages and payroll, simple interest and simple discount, compound interest, future value, and present value, mortgages, sinking funds, and amortization, depreciation, inventory, insurance, business insurance, life insurance, annuities, taxes, stocks and bonds. Students will also gain an understanding of financial instruments and terminology used in business finance. This serves as a foundation for further studies in business, management, accounting, and finance. Students will gain skills to manage personal finance.

Note: This study is appropriate for students who need general education credit in mathematics.

MGMT 3060

Organizational Behavior

This study in organizational behavior (OB) explores the sociological and psychological foundations of behavior in organizations and seeks to understand how the behavior exhibited by individuals and groups affects organizational structures, processes, and ultimately, performance and effectiveness. This study focuses on the core concepts, theories, and methods of human and of organizational behavior. Its main objective is to analyze, understand, and manage the development of complex and multifaceted contemporary organizational behavior. Topics include the changing environment of organization, foundation of individual behavior, motivation, communication, conflict and negotiation, power, politics, organizational justice, leadership, decision making and problem solving, organization culture, and organization change and development. This course meets the understanding people in an organizational context area of study guidelines for students in the business, management and economics area.

Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Principles of Management (MGMT_1005), or equivalent.

This course was previously BME-214614.

MGIS 3010

Management Info Systems

In this course, students explore the impact of advances in information technology in the context of organizational decision making and the potential of an effective management information system to contribute to organizational learning, to be a source of competitive advantage, and to assist an organization competing in a global arena. By exploring systems from a managerial and organizational perspective, students will develop the capacity to examine the interactions among people, technology, and processes and recommend solutions to complex business problems.

Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Management Principles or equivalent Assumptions about surrounding courses: Students should have a basic understanding of computers along with a fundamental understanding of computer use in an organizational environment. In addition, students should have an understanding of basic management principles. This can be gained through a course such as Management Principles or equivalent knowledge through professional experience.

This course was previously SMT-273754 Management Information Systems.

PHIL 2020

Introduction to Ethics

Learn about some of the ways that ethicists reason about such topics as 'good and bad' or 'right and wrong' or 'morality' in a range of contexts.

NOTE: Students should not take both the 4-credit and the 2-credit courses titled Introduction to Ethics as these overlap.

This course was previously CUL-222244 Introduction to Ethics (2-4cr).

PHOT 1015

History of Photography: Intro

Students will begin with a quick study of a comprehensive text, followed by research and writing on diverse focal points of interest. Research should include relevant technological, economic, political, artistic perspectives. Students are encouraged to visit, when reasonably possible, photographic exhibitions at museums and galleries.

PHOT 3015

History of Photography: Advanced

Students will begin with a quick study of a comprehensive text, followed by research and writing on diverse focal points of interest. Research should include relevant technological, economic, political, artistic perspectives. Students are encouraged to visit, when reasonably possible, photographic exhibitions at museums and galleries.

This course was previously ART-223654 Photography: A History."

PSYC 1005

Introduction to Psychology

The purpose of this course is to gain an overview and examine the various disciplines, core concepts, and theories of psychology. The course will examine the basic concepts of psychology as a social science. Students will examine the major ideas/theories/disciplines within psychology, such as research methods, sensation/perception, memory, theories of personality, psychological disorders, social psychology, and others. Throughout this course, an emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of psychology as a science of human thought and behavior.

This course was previously HDV-282164.

PSYC 3055

Cultural Psychology

Cultural psychology is the comparative study of cultural effects on human psychology. It examines psychological diversity and the links between cultural norms and behavior. It will examine the ways in which particular human activities are influenced by social and cultural forces. Students can expect to develop a broader, global perception of contemporary psychology. Activities are intended to explain current psychological knowledge and its applications from a cross-cultural perspective. Additionally, this course will assist in developing a useful set of critical-thinking tools with which to analyze and evaluate psychology from various cultural perspectives.

While it is not required, it might be helpful if students have taken Introduction to Psychology or an equivalent course.

This course was previously HDV-283544.

SOCI 1005

Exploring Society: Sociology

This introductory study explores the body of knowledge we call 'sociology'-the study of how humans construct their social worlds and how human interactions are influenced by that world. Students will learn about the history of sociology, about the major theories and ways of thinking sociologists have used to make sense of our world, and about key concepts such as class, race, status, ethnicity, gender, socialization, deviance, social control, power and social structure. Students also will be introduced to various research methods social scientists use to help us understand society and the many significant debates about social issues that we face today.

This course was previously SOC-282124 Exploring Society.

SPAN 1010

Intro Spanish: Language & Cult

Introductory Spanish: Language and Culture is designed for students who have no previous Spanish instruction. This course introduces students to the Spanish language, but the emphasis is on the studies of the cultures of the Spanish- speaking world. Language learning in this course will focus on understanding and learning to speak simple phrases, learning limited vocabulary and very basic grammatical structures. All language skills will be practiced: listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course also introduces students to the Spanish-speaking cultures of Spain, Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean and South America. Students will learn similarities and differences in values, attitudes and actions as they investigate different cultures through a wide variety of resources (e.g., online resources, texts, videos). Students will also investigate specific topics related to cultural experiences (e.g., ecotourism in Costa Rica, indigenous cultures in Guatemala). Students should be available for oral practices at least once a week. Special accommodations will be made for army students.

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

There is no overlap with Spanish 1

This course was previously CUL-221294 Introductory Spanish: Language and Culture.

THEA 3065

Hamilton: An American Musical

This course analyzes the theatrical aspects of the Tony Award winning musical, Hamilton. Students will explore the evolution of this musical and will delve into a creative critique of the musical’s story, music, choreography, staging, design elements, casting and more. We will also study the creator of Hamilton, Lin-Manuel Miranda, and will situate his work within theater history. We will consider questions such as: Why is this musical so popular? What makes this musical stand out from other musicals? And, as so many people ask, why are tickets to this musical so expensive? Note: Students in this course are not required to have seen a production of Hamilton.

COMW 1005

College Writing

College writing focuses on the basics of academic writing: writing processes, essays, research skills. Students will write and evaluate thesis statements for essays, and learn how to develop the thesis idea with supporting details. Students will learn how to structure ideas and information in essays. Students will learn how to research, incorporate, and document sources to support a thesis argument. Additionally, students will develop proficiency in oral discourse through discussion of essays and college writing skills.

This course was previously CUL-221624 College Writing. Depending on their goals and needs, students may take any of five different, introductory, college writing courses: COMW 1005, COMW 1015, COMW 1010, COMW 2005, or COMW 2020. Although all of these courses deal with similar skills and knowledge (writing process, thesis, support, documentation), they have different emphases. Note that, according to college policy, students can include up to 8 introductory-level expository/college writing credits in their ESC degree.

COMW 2005

Effective Academic Writing

This course examines different types of academic writing (e.g., collage, reflective essay, critique, persuasive research essay, lesson) and key elements of style that writers manipulate to create effective writing (e.g., sentence structure, paragraph creation, diction, language choice). Although the course will provide the chance to work on basic academic writing concepts (e.g., creating a thesis, researching and documenting sources), the focus will be on extending this learning to different types of academic writing and making writing more precise, concise, and interesting. This course will provide students with the opportunity to apply and refine basic college writing skills to create effective academic prose.

This course was previously CUL-232042 Effective Academic Writing. Depending on their goals and needs, students may take any of five different, introductory, college writing courses: COMW 1005, COMW 1015, COMW 1010, COMW 2005, or COMW 2020. Although all of these courses deal with similar skills and knowledge (writing process, thesis, support, documentation), they have different emphases. Note that, according to college policy, students can include up to 8 introductory-level expository/college writing credits in their ESC degree.

This course may be used to fulfill educational planning credit with mentor approval

COMW 3122

Proposal Writing

Develop analytical, research, and writing skills at the upper level. Proposal Writing offers a way of honing these skills in a concrete, real-world context. Students will read and analyze sample proposals and build on basic communication theory to learn what constitutes appropriate proposal content and format. Students will learn how to find, use, and evaluate the quality of evidence to logically support their proposal ideas. Students will write a short academic proposal and two longer, formal, work- or community-related proposals. They will share and provide feedback on drafts as part of learning how to analyze a proposal’s effectiveness.

Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Ability to do advanced-level work Notes: Students cannot take both versions of the course. This course may be used for educational planning credit with mentor approval.

This course was previously CUL-233052 Proposal Writing (2cr).