The Arts Area of Study Guidelines for Students Matriculated on or After Sept. 1, 2021

The Arts Area of Study Guidelines for Students Matriculated on or After Sept. 1, 2021

Sponsor:

School of Arts and Humanities

Contact:

Arts & Media Department Chair

Category:

Academic

Number:

100.

Effective Date:

09/01/2021

Implementation History:

Keywords:

arts, media, visual arts, performing arts, digital arts, digital media, photography, music, creative writing, film, museum studies

Background Information:

Purpose

Definitions

Statements

Introduction/Overview

The Arts area of study encompasses a wide range of possible studies and concentrations in the arts including, but not limited to, the visual arts, the performing arts, digital arts and digital media, photography, music, creative writing, film, and museum studies. Students are encouraged to consider including learning about more than one artistic discipline and the cultures/histories of those disciplines in their degree plans.

Associate degree guidelines

Studies in The Arts include seven foundations, listed below. For the associate degree, students are expected to meet a minimum of at least four foundations through courses and/or prior learning assessment. The rationale essay should explain how these foundations have been incorporated in the degree plan. Students should also explain in the rationale essay how their experience and proficiency in the arts relates to their degree goals. Note: A single course can address multiple guidelines.

Associate degree concentrations in the arts include foundational knowledge which prepare students for more advanced-level work. Knowledge demonstrated in the degree plan may be achieved through transcript credits, prior learning assessment credits, or courses taken at SUNY Empire. Associate degrees typically incorporate a broad base of knowledge related to the concentration. As a reminder, students are encouraged to consider including learning about more than one artistic discipline and the cultures/histories of those disciplines in their degree plans.

Mentors and students designing concentrations in the Arts are invited to consult with Arts faculty in their concentration area as they design their degrees.

The organizing framework for a student’s concentration should ultimately serve the student’s goals for the degree and should make sense given the student’s past transcript credits, prior learning credits, and experience in the arts. While not an exhaustive list, some possible frameworks include:

  • practice, performance, and creation
  • historical studies
  • sociocultural studies
  • critical/theoretical studies
  • integration of the arts in other professions (i.e. arts management, museum studies, educational studies in the arts, etc.)

Students may choose to organize these frameworks around disciplinary, interdisciplinary, problem-oriented, professional/vocational, or thematic approaches.

All students are expected to discuss the organizing framework of their concentration in their degree program rationale essay and explain how the courses and/or prior learning assessment topics in the concentration effectively work together to meet the needs of the concentration.

Foundations

Foundation # 1: Historical Perspectives

  • Learning outcome: Identify the diverse historical perspectives of at least one form of creative expression.

Foundation # 2: Artistic Practice

  • Learning outcome: Analyze, create, produce, and/or perform at least one form of artistic practice.

Foundation #3: Artistic Theory

  • Learning outcome: Describe the interconnectedness between artistic theory and artistic practice in at least one form of creative expression.

Foundation # 4: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

  • Learning outcome: Discuss and assess a range of social, cultural, or global perspectives in the arts.

Note: These perspectives may include, but are not limited to, race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, nationality, socioeconomic status, language, (dis)ability, age, religious commitment or, political perspective (https://dei.extension.org/).

Foundation # 5: Research Skills

  • Learning outcome: Conduct research using libraries and credible online resources to critically assess and articulate artistic concepts or practices.

Foundation # 6: Critical Thinking Skills

  • Learning outcome: Apply critical thinking skills to describe, interpret, and critique artistic works.

Note: Critical thinking is defined in the ESC Learning Goals.

Foundation # 7: Ethical and Social Responsibility

  • Learning outcome: Analyze, discuss, and apply ethical and social responsibility within the arts.

Note: Social Responsibility is defined in the ESC Learning Goals.

Bachelor’s degree guidelines

Bachelor’s degrees in the arts must include the seven Arts Area of Study foundations listed below. The rationale essay should explain how these foundations have been incorporated in the degree plan. Students should also explain in the rationale essay how their experience and proficiency in the arts relates to their degree goals. Note: A single course can address multiple guidelines.

Bachelor’s degree concentrations in the arts begin with foundational knowledge, which prepare the student for more advanced-level work. Foundational studies may be achieved through transcript credits, prior learning assessment credits, or courses taken at SUNY Empire. Advanced-level competency should be developed in those areas which are most relevant to the specific concentration design and to the specific organizing framework. In planning the concentration, consideration should be given both to depth and breadth of learning. As a reminder, students are encouraged to consider including learning about more than one artistic discipline and the cultures/histories of those disciplines in their degree plans.

Mentors and students designing concentrations in the Arts are invited to consult with Arts faculty in their concentration area as they design their degrees.

The organizing framework for a student’s concentration should ultimately serve the student’s goals for the degree and should make sense given the student’s past transcript credits, prior learning credits, and experience in the arts. While not an exhaustive list, some possible frameworks include:

  • practice, performance, and creation
  • historical studies
  • sociocultural studies
  • critical/theoretical studies
  • integration of the arts in other professions (i.e. arts management, museum studies, educational studies in the arts, etc.)

Students may choose to organize these frameworks around disciplinary, interdisciplinary, problem-oriented, professional/vocational, or thematic approaches.
All students are expected to discuss the organizing framework of their concentration in their degree program rationale essay and explain how the courses and/or prior learning assessment topics in the concentration effectively work together to meet the needs of the concentration.

Foundations

Foundation # 1: Historical Perspectives

  • Learning outcome: Identify the diverse historical perspectives of at least one form of creative expression.

Foundation # 2: Artistic Practice

  • Learning outcome: Analyze, create, produce, and/or perform at least one form of artistic practice. 

Foundation #3: Artistic Theory

  • Learning outcome: Describe the interconnectedness between artistic theory and artistic practice in at least one form of creative expression.

Foundation # 4: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

  • Learning outcome: Discuss and assess a range of social, cultural, or global perspectives in the arts.

Note: These perspectives may include, but are not limited to, race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, nationality, socioeconomic status, language, (dis)ability, age, religious commitment or, political perspective (https://dei.extension.org/).

Foundation # 5: Research Skills

  • Learning outcome: Conduct research using libraries and credible online resources to critically assess and articulate artistic concepts or practices.

Foundation # 6: Critical Thinking Skills

  • Learning outcome: Apply critical thinking skills to describe, interpret, and critique artistic works.

Note: Critical thinking is defined in the ESC Learning Goals.

Foundation # 7: Ethical and Social Responsibility

  • Learning outcome: Analyze, discuss, and apply ethical and social responsibility within the arts.

Note: Social Responsibility is defined in the ESC Learning Goals.

Continuing Study

Students who wish to continue their studies on the graduate level should consult the entrance requirements and guidelines for professional degrees that have been developed by art schools, graduate programs, and professional associations. These students are also encouraged to discuss their goals with an Arts faculty member who specializes in their area of interest.

Applicable Legislation and Regulations

Related References, Policies, Procedures, Forms and Appendices