Area of Study Guidelines Cultural Studies for Students Matriculated on or After Sept. 1 2021

Area of Study Guidelines Cultural Studies for Students Matriculated on or After Sept. 1 2021

Sponsor:

School of Arts and Humanities

Contact:

Department Chair, Literature, Communication and Cultural Studies

Category:

Academic

Number:

100.

Effective Date:

09/01/2021

Implementation History:

Keywords:

communications, media, language, literature, philosophy, religion, writing, cultural studies

Background Information:

Purpose

Definitions

Statements


Area of Study Guidelines:  Cultural Studies

Overview

Cultural studies explore how human beings make sense of our world and the qualities that make us most human. Disciplines such as communications and media, language, literature, philosophy, religion, and writing develop our awareness; our abilities to think, feel, and speak; our appreciation of the values and knowledge underlying these fields; and our sense of ourselves as connected to a greater whole.

All degree programs in Cultural Studies (Associate and Bachelor degrees) should address the following four guidelines:

Area of Study Learning Outcomes

1.    Knowledge of a field or fields

Learning Outcome: demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the historical
foundations, current issues, and major texts in an area of Cultural Studies inquiry.

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • COMM 1020 Introduction to Communication
  • CUST 4020 Medical Humanities
  • LING 1005 Introduction to Linguistics
  • LING 3020 Language and Culture
  • LITR 1005 Introduction to Literature
  • LITR 2036 Exploring Literature
  • LITR 3150 Issues in Literature
  • PHIL 2005 Introduction to Philosophy
  • RELI 2025 Intro to Religious Studies

 

2.    Theoretical knowledge

Learning Outcome: examine, explain, and apply theories, critical approaches, and methodologies in an area of Cultural Studies inquiry.   

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • ARTS 1140 Media and Visual Literacy
  • COMM 3998 Communications Theory
  • CUST 2010 Introduction to Culture
  • CUST 2025 Food/Drink Cultural Context: Intro
  • CUST 3015 Food & Drink in Cultural Context: Adv
  • CUST 3152 Queering American Culture
  • CUST 3172 Mythology & Modern Life
  • CUST 3425 Sex & Sexuality in Western Civ
  • CUST 4020 Medical Humanities
  • DIGA 4015 History & Theory of New Media
  • LING 1005 Introduction to Linguistics
  • LING 3020 Language and Culture
  • LITR 2035 Exploring the Disciplines: Literature
  • LITR 3049 Literary Theory
  • LITR 3050 Literary Interpretation as a Method of Inquiry
  • LITR 3150 Issues in Literature
  • PHIL-2005 Introduction to Philosophy
  • PHIL 2020 Introduction to Ethics
  • RELI 2025 Intro to Religious Studies
  • RELI 4010 Religious Thought in World Perspective

 

3.    Diverse perspectives and social responsibility

Learning Outcome: examine and reflect on diverse cross-cultural perspectives in an area of inquiry (e.g., questions of race, gender, class, ethnicity, religion, sexual identity, disability, migration, etc.); and consider the responsibilities of members in a just society.

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • ASLG 1005 American Sign Language I
  • COMM 1005 Intercultural Communications
  • COMM 3025 Media Ethics & the Law
  • COMM 3045 Television & Culture
  • COMM 4015 Women, Girls, & the Media
  • COMW 3020 War Stories
  • CUST 2010 Introduction to Culture
  • CUST 2025 Food & Drink Cultural Context: Intro
  • CUST 3015 Food & Drink in Cultural Context: Adv
  • CUST 3152 Queering American Culture
  • CUST 3172 Mythology & Modern Life
  • CUST 3177 Water: Local and Global Perspectives
  • CUST 3182 Exploring Place: History: Adv
  • CUST 3425 Sex & Sexuality in Western Civ
  • CUST 4005 Exploring Places: Arts
  • CUST 4010 Exploring Place: Humanities
  • DIGA 4015 History & Theory of New Media
  • LING 3020 Language and Culture
  • LITR 2005 African American Women’s Literature
  • LITR 2006 African American Literature: Intro
  • LITR 2040 Global Multicultural Literature: Introductory
  • LITR 3008 African American Literature: Advanced
  • LITR 3015 Cultural Diversity through Literary Art
  • LITR 3030 Global Multicultural Literature: Advanced
  • LITR 3080 Native American Literature
  • LITR 3130 US Multicultural Fiction
  • LITR 3132 Asian American Writers
  • LITR 3135 U.S. Women’s Multicultural Life Writings
  • LITR 3140 West African Literature
  • LITR 3160 Literature of the Holocaust
  • PHIL-2005 Introduction to Philosophy
  • PHIL-2020 Introduction to Ethics
  • RELI-2025 Intro to Religious Studies
  • RELI-4010 Religious Thought in World Perspective
  • SPAN-1005 Introductory Spanish: Language & Culture
  • SPAN-3030 Latinx in the US

4.    Critical thinking, reading, and writing

Learning Outcome: read, write and evaluate print-based and digital media sources of information critically, i.e., with sustained attention to meaning, presentation, and argument.  Build the capacity to identify and describe main ideas, underlying assumptions, and valid conclusions.  Create and share information using a range of collaborative technologies; evaluate and cite sources correctly.  

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • COMM 2010 Media Writing
  • COMM 3030 News & Feature Writing
  • COMM 3050 The American Cinema
  • COMM 3045 Television & Culture
  • COMM 4015 Women, Girls, & the Media
  • COMW 1005 College Writing
  • COMW 1015 Introduction to College Reading and Writing
  • COMW 2005 Effective Academic Writing
  • COMW 2010 Grant Writing
  • COMW 3005 Proposal Writing and Logical Argument
  • COMW 3006 Research Writing: Advanced
  • COMW 3112 Proposal Writing
  • Any CUST course
  • Any LING course
  • Any LITR course
  • Any PHIL course
  • Any RELI course



CONCENTRATION GUIDELINES

Concentrations in Cultural Studies begin with foundational studies, which prepare the student for more advanced-level work.  Advanced-level competency should be developed in those areas which are most relevant to the specific concentration design and to the specific organizing framework.  In planning the concentration, consideration should be given both to depth and breadth.

Students wishing to pursue individualized concentrations should use the general AOS guidelines as an organizing framework for their degree plans.

Specific guidelines have been developed for concentrations in the following areas:

    1.    Communication and Media
    2.    Literature
    3.    Philosophy
    4.    Religious Studies
    5.    World Languages
    6.    Writing

Students interested in journalism or broadcasting should consult the concentration guidelines for Communication and Media, Writing, or a combination of these.

Students interested in English should consult the concentration guidelines for Literature, Writing, Communication and Media, or a combination of these.

Concentration in Communication and Media

Concentrations in communication and media studies should demonstrate knowledge of processes, procedures, methodologies and media involved in interactions between people and within groups, and the dissemination of information and ideas. Twenty-first-century studies in communication and media include an examination of media’s impact on culture, democracy and digital identity in an era of rapid technological change and emerging environments as well as practical skills for the 21st century workplace.

Associate Degrees in Cultural Studies with concentration in communications and media

Associate students should take at least one course for each of the following outcomes and choose one professional skills track.

Writing skills (correlates with the Critical thinking, reading, and writing guideline)

Learning Outcome: demonstrate basic writing and research skills         

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • COMW 1005 College Writing
  • COMW 1015 Introduction to College Reading and Writing
  • COMW 2005 Effective Academic Writing
  • COMW 3005 Proposal Writing and Logical Argument
  • COMW 3006 Research Writing: Advanced
  • COMW 3112 Proposal Writing

Field Knowledge (correlates with the Knowledge of a Field or Fields guideline)

Learning Outcome: explain fundamental principles of the field of communication including individual, group, and mass communication or media communication.

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • COMM-1020 Introduction to Communication

Learning Outcome: interpret media artifacts, which may include examples from print, radio, television, and/or the internet

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)
ARTS-1140 Media and Visual Literacy

Learning Outcome: Explain principles of individual and group communications

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • COMM-1005 Intercultural Communications
  • COMM-1010 Interpersonal Communication
  • COMM-2xxx Digital Communication Strategies 1
  • COMM-3xxx Digital Communication Strategies 2
Professional Skills

Learning Outcome: demonstrate basic skills in one of the following tracks

 

Marketing Track

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • MRKT-1005 Marketing Principles [Prerequisite for all other Marketing courses]
  • MRKT-3010 Consumer Behavior
  • MRKT-3025 Digital Marketing
  • MRKT-3055 Public Relations
  • MRKT-3045 Marketing Management
  • MRKT-4030 Marketing Ethics
  • MRKT-4035 Marketing Research [pre-requisite, Statistics and Marketing Principles]
  • MRKT-4040 Marketing Strategy

 

Writing/Journalism Track

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • CRWR-1000 Intro to Creative Writing
  • CRWR-1015 Creative Nonfiction: Introductory
  • COMW-2005 Effective Academic Writing
  • COMM-2010 Media Writing
  • COMW-2010 Grant Writing
  • COMW-3010 Speechwriting
  • COMM-3030 News & Feature Writing
  • CRWR-3015 Creative Nonfiction: Advanced
  • COMW-3015 Technical Writing
  • COMW-3122 Proposal Writing
  • DIGA-3040 Digital Storytelling
  • CRWR-4005 Craft & Practice in Creative Writing

 

Digital Communications Track

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • COMM 2xxx Digital Communication Strategies 1
  • DIGA-1010 Digital Art & Design: Intro
  • DIGA-2xxx Digital Communication Strategies 2
  • DIGA-3035 Digital Art & Design: Adv
  • COMM-3015 Communication through New Media
  • DIGA-3040 Digital Storytelling
  • DIGA-3045 Game Design & Development
  • DIGA-3050 Information Design
  • DIGA-3065 Media Arts
Interpersonal and Group Communications Track

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • COMM-1030 Public Speaking
  • COMM 2xxx Digital Communication Strategies 1
  • DIGA-2xxx Digital Communication Strategies 2
  • COMM-3055 Organizational Communication
  • COMM-3060 Political Communication
  • COMM-3005 Communication Analysis
  • COMM-4025 Communication Decisions

 

Bachelor’s Degrees in Cultural Studies with concentration in communications and media.

Bachelor students should take at least one course for each of the following outcomes.

Field Knowledge (correlates with the Knowledge of a field guideline)

Learning Outcome: Explain fundamental principles of the field of communication including individual, group, and mass communication or media communication.

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • COMM-1020 Introduction to Communication

Learning Outcome: Interpret media artifacts, which may include examples from print, radio, television, and/or the internet

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • ARTS-1140 Media and Visual Literacy

 

Historical Knowledge and Currency

Learning Outcome: Trace the development of the history of at least one form of media, including past and future technologies and products.

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • COMM-3050 The American Cinema
  • COMM-3045 Television & Culture
  • COMM-4015 Women Girls & the Media
  • DIGA-4015 History & Theory of New Media

Learning Outcome: Demonstrate advanced usage of current media technologies

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • COMM-3015 Communication through New Media  
  • DIGA-2xxx Digital Communication Strategies

 

Theoretical or methodological application (correlates with Theoretical knowledge)

Learning Outcome: examine, explain, and apply theories, critical approaches, and/or methodologies in communication and/or media.

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • COMM-3998 Communications Theory
  • DIGA-4015 History & Theory of New Media

 

Diverse perspectives and social responsibility (correlates with Diverse perspectives and social responsibility outcome)

Learning Outcome: examine and reflect on diverse cross-cultural perspectives in communication and/or media (e.g., questions of race, gender, class, ethnicity, religion, sexual identity, disability, migration, etc.); and consider the responsibilities of members in a just society.

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • COMM-3050 The American Cinema
  • COMM-3045 Television & Culture
  • COMM-4015 Women Girls & the Media

Learning Outcome: Apply ethical and legal principles of communication and media

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • COMM-3025-Media Ethics & Law

 

Synthesis of Understanding and Future Preparation

Learning Outcome: Synthesize knowledge and skills to prepare for future

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • COMM-3998 Capstone in Media & Communications
Skills

Learning Outcome: Demonstrate basic writing and research skills

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • COMW 1005 College Writing
  • COMW 1015 Introduction to College Reading and Writing
  • COMW 2005 Effective Academic Writing
  • COMW 3005 Proposal Writing and Logical Argument
  • COMW 3006 Research Writing: Advanced
  • COMW 3112 Proposal Writing

 

Learning Outcome: Explain principles of individual and group communications

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • COMM-1005 Intercultural Communications
  • COMM-1010 Interpersonal Communication
  • COMM-2xxx Digital Communication Strategies 1
  • COMM-3xxx Digital Communication Strategies 2

 

Learning Outcome: Demonstrate advanced skills in one of the following tracks (choose at least one course)

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

Marketing Track
  • MRKT-1005 Marketing Principles [Prerequisite for all other Marketing courses]
  • MRKT-3010 Consumer Behavior
  • MRKT-3025 Digital Marketing
  • MRKT-3055 Public Relations
  • MRKT-3045 Marketing Management
  • MRKT-4030 Marketing Ethics
  • MRKT-4035 Marketing Research [pre-requisite, Statistics and Marketing Principles]
  • MRKT-4040 Marketing Strategy
  Writing/Journalism Track
  • CRWR-1000 Intro to Creative Writing
  • CRWR-1015 Creative Nonfiction: Introductory  
  • COMW-2005 Effective Academic Writing
  • COMM-2010 Media Writing
  • COMW-2010 Grant Writing
  • COMW-3010 Speechwriting
  • COMM-3030 News & Feature Writing
  • CRWR-3015, Creative Nonfiction: Advanced
  • COMW-3015 Technical Writing
  • COMW-3122 Proposal Writing
  • DIGA-3040 Digital Storytelling
  • CRWR-4005 Craft & Practice in Creative Writing
 Digital Communications Track
  • COMM 2xxx Digital Communication Strategies 1
  • DIGA-1010 Digital Art & Design: Intro
  • DIGA-2xxx Digital Communication Strategies 2
  • DIGA-3035 Digital Art & Design: Adv
  • DIGA-3040 Digital Storytelling
  • DIGA-3045 Game Design & Development
  • DIGA-3050 Information Design
  • DIGA-3065 Media Arts
 Interpersonal and Group Communications Track
  • COMM-1030 Public Speaking
  • COMM 2xxx Digital Communication Strategies 1  
  • DIGA-2xxx Digital Communication Strategies 2
  • COMM-3055 Organizational Communication
  • COMM-3060 Political Communication
  • COMM-3005 Communication Analysis
  • COMM-4025 Communication Decisions


Concentration in Literature

The literature concentration is designed to develop students' critical thinking, expository writing and analytic abilities through a study of works of literature written primarily in English. Through a study of texts from different periods, genres and national origins, students will develop a breadth and depth of knowledge and understanding of literature, including authors, themes and literary works. Students are expected to learn about formal aspects of writing as well as the broader cultural and historical contexts of literary texts.

Literature concentrations should address the following:

Foundational knowledge (Correlates with the Knowledge of a field guideline)

Learning Outcome: demonstrate an understanding of the field of literary studies.

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • LITR 1005 Introduction to Literature
  • LITR 2036 Exploring Literature
  • LITR 3150 Issues in Literature

Theory and Criticism (Correlates with the Theoretical knowledge guideline)

Learning Outcomes: demonstrate an understanding of critical approaches to literature.  B.A. degree plans should also demonstrate an advanced knowledge of literary theory

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • LITR 2035 Exploring the Disciplines: Literature
  • LITR 3049 Literary Theory
  • LITR 3050 Literary Interpretation as a Method of Inquiry
  • LITR 3150 Issues in Literature

Diversity (Correlates with the Diverse perspectives and social responsibility guideline)

Learning Outcome: demonstrate an understanding of issues of diversity in literary studies (African-American literature, Native-American literature, Asian-American literature, Latino-American literature, multicultural writers, women writers, women's and gender studies, queer fiction, immigrant literature, social protest fiction and disability studies)

Courses which contribute to the meeting of this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • LITR 2005 African American Women’s Literature
  • LITR 2006 African American Literature: Intro
  • LITR 2040 Global Multicultural Literature: Intro
  • LITR 3008 African American Literature: Adv
  • LITR 3015 Cultural Diversity through Literary Art
  • LITR 3030 Global Multicultural Literature: Adv
  • LITR 3080 Native American Literature
  • LITR 3130 US Multicultural Fiction
  • LITR 3132 Asian American Writers
  • LITR 3133 American Women Writers
  • LITR 3135 U.S. Women’s Multicultural Life Writings
  • LITR 3140 West African Literature
  • LITR 3160 Literature of the Holocaust
  • LITR 3071 Immigrant Literature

Genres of Literature

Learning Outcome: demonstrate an understanding of several genres of literature, including poetry, fiction, and drama (may also include knowledge of creative writing, memoir and more experimental techniques)

Courses which contribute to the meeting of this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • LITR 2020 An Introduction to the Modern Short Story
  • LITR 2030 Children’s Literature: Introductory
  • LITR 2050 Science Fiction & the Human Dynamic
  • LITR 3010 Children’s Literature: Advanced
  • LITR 3020 Experiencing Poetry
  • LITR 3022 Ekphrasis Poetry
  • LITR 3025 Folktales, Fairytales, & Fantasy Literature
  • LITR 3035 Ideal Worlds: Utopian Literature
  • LITR 3045 Listening to the Land: The Literature of Nature
  • LITR 3046 Poetry
  • LITR 3090 Science Fiction & the Human Dynamic: Adv
  • LITR 3095 Shakespeare
  • LITR 3115 The Modern Short Story
  • LITR 3120 The Popular Romance Novel
  • LITR 3127 The Graphic Novel
  • LITR 3145 Young Adult Literature
  • LITR 3207 American Poetry

Literary periods

Learning Outcome: demonstrate an understanding of literary periods (may include knowledge of early/late British literature and/or/early/late American literature; it may include comparative literature from other literatures in English)

Courses which contribute to the meeting of this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • LITR 2010 American Literature 1600-1865
  • LITR 2015 American Literature 1865-Present
  • LITR 3040 Jane Austen
  • LITR 3062 British Literature to 1798
  • LITR 3065 Literature of the American Renaissance
  • LITR 3075 Literature and Culture of the Vampire
  • LITR 3095 Shakespeare
  • LITR 3141 Modern American Literature
  • LITR 3192 20th Century American Literature

Depth (applies only to B.A. degree plans)

Learning Outcome: demonstrate advanced knowledge of one or more major authors, literary movements, themes, or genres

Courses which meet this guideline include any appropriate advanced-level literature course

Concentration in Philosophy

Existing both as an academic discipline in its own right and as the activity of philosophical inquiry (or "philosophizing") that is integral to numerous other academic areas (political theory, literary theory, fine arts, comparative religion, sociology of scientific knowledge, linguistics, etc.), philosophy is a cornerstone of the humanities. A concentration in philosophy can be organized in many different ways and should therefore reflect the student's particular learning goals. Note that students who are considering the pursuit of a graduate degree in the actual discipline of philosophy should research the expectations of graduate programs offering such a degree and plan their concentration accordingly.

Philosophy concentrations at both the Associates and Bachelor's level should address the following:

Ethics

Learning Outcome: Articulate philosophical questions, perspectives, and arguments in

    ethics using vocabulary, concepts, and methods deriving from the discipline of

    philosophy and/or other academic areas with significant philosophical components.

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • PHIL-2005 Introduction to Philosophy
  • PHIL-2020 Introduction to Ethics
  • PHIL-2010 Environmental Ethics
  • PHIL-3100 Environmental Ethics: Advanced
  • PHIL-2030 Social Ethics

Courses which contribute to the meeting of this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • CUST-2055 The Pursuit of Happiness in American History

Politics

Learning Outcome: Articulate philosophical questions, perspectives, and arguments in politics using vocabulary, concepts, and methods deriving from the discipline of philosophy and/or other academic areas with significant philosophical components.

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • PHIL-2005 Introduction to Philosophy
  • POLI-3015 Ancient Political Theory
  • POLI-3080 Modern Political Theory
  • POLI-3005 America's Founding Ideas
  • POLI-4010 Global Perspectives on Political Theory
  • POLI-3035 Democracy: Theory and Practice PHIL-4015 Social/Political Philosophy

Metaphysics (questions of "reality")

Learning Outcome: Articulate philosophical questions, perspectives, and arguments in metaphysics using vocabulary, concepts, and methods deriving from the discipline of philosophy and/or other academic areas with significant philosophical components.


Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • PHIL-2005 Introduction to Philosophy

Epistemology (questions of "knowing")

Learning Outcome: Articulate philosophical questions, perspectives, and arguments in epistemology using vocabulary, concepts, and methods deriving from the discipline of philosophy and/or other academic areas with significant philosophical components.

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • PHIL-2005 Introduction to Philosophy

 

Logic and Reasoning

Learning Outcome: Articulate philosophical questions, perspectives, and arguments in logic and reasoning using vocabulary, concepts, and methods deriving from the discipline of philosophy and/or other academic areas with significant philosophical

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • PHIL-2005 Introduction to Philosophy
  • CUST-2030 Critical Thinking

 

 Philosophy concentrations at the Bachelor's level should also address the following:

 Two (or more) specialized areas of advanced-level philosophical inquiry. Examples of such areas include but are not limited to social and cultural theory (e.g., social justice, queer theory, feminist theory), philosophy of art (aesthetics), literary theory, environmental ethics, political philosophy/theory, philosophy of religion, African philosophy, East Asian philosophy, history of Western philosophy, philosophy of language, and logic.

Learning Outcome: Articulate at an advanced-level philosophical questions, perspectives, and arguments in at least two specialized areas using vocabulary, concepts, and methods deriving from the discipline of philosophy and/or other academic areas with significant philosophical components.

Courses that contribute to the meeting of this guideline include (to fully meet the guideline, two or more areas need to be addressed):

 for social and cultural theory  

  • GSST-3015 Feminist Theory
  • SOSC-3015 Great Conversations in Social Thought
  • GSST-3152 Queer Theory
  • SOCI-4035 Privacy Security & Freedom

  for philosophy of art

  • ARTS-4070 What is Art?
  • ARTP-4010 Performance Theory
  • LACS-6080 Cultural Theory of Dance

  for literary theory  

  • LITR-3049 Literary Theory
  • LITR-3050 Literary Interpretation as a Method of Inquiry
  • LACS-6155 Literary Theory

  for environmental ethics  

  • PHIL-3100 Environmental Ethics: Advanced

 for political philosophy/theory  

  • POLI-3015 Ancient Political Theory
  • POLI-3080 Modern Political Theory
  • POLI-3005 America's Founding Ideas
  • POLI-4010 Global Perspectives on Political Theory
  • POLI-3035 Democracy: Theory and Practice
  • PHIL-4015 Social/Political Philosophy
  • LEST-4020 Theories of Laws & Justice

  for East Asian philosophy  

  • PHIL-3005 Asian Worldviews

 for history of Western philosophy  

  • HIST-3490 The Enlightenment
  • HIST-3415 Renaissance & Reformation

  for religious ethics  

  • RELI-4005 Comparative Religious Ethics

 for miscellaneous advanced-level topics  

  • LITR-3035 Ideal Worlds: Utopian Literature
  • PHIL-3998 Individualized Studies in Philosophy
  • PHIL-4998 Individualized Studies in Philosophy

     

    Note: Applied philosophy courses (e.g., professional ethics courses) may be included as part of a philosophy concentration but do not meet (partially or fully) the guideline for advanced-level philosophical inquiry.

    Examples of such courses include:

  • BUSN-3010 Business Ethics
  • BUSN-3050 Ethics of Business & Public Administration
  • BUSN-3055 Ethics & the Ecology of Business
  • COMM-3025 Media Ethics & Law
  • CRJS-3040 Ethical Dilemmas in Criminal Justice
  • DIGA-3036 Ethics of Digital Art & Design
  • EDET-6020 Issues and Ethics in the Digital Age
  • EDST-3036 Legal and Ethical Dimensions of Technology for Educators
  • FSMA-3020 Finance Society & Ethics
  • HCLM-6045 Case Studies in Bioethics
  • HLAD-3045 Healthcare Ethics
  • HUSC-4030 Human Service Ethics
  • MGMT-3015 Ethics for a Global Economy
  • MGMT-6200 Business Ethics & Compliance
  • MRKT-4030 Marketing Ethics
  • PAFF-3122 Ethics and the Public Sector
  • PAFF-4132 Legal & Ethical Foundations of Public Service
  • PBHS-6005 Public History Ethics and Professionalism
  • PPOL-6025 Ethical Issues in Social Policy
  • PSYC-3065 Ethical Issues in Psychology

     

Concentration in Religious Studies

Religious stories and devotional behaviors are a core part of most human societies. Throughout time, religions and their varying communities and traditions of interpretation have played vital roles in culturally and politically shaping and reshaping our lives and world. To elucidate this complex of personal, social and historical interconnections requires multiple perspectives and the consideration of diverse religious texts, beliefs and practices.

Although individuals may find religious studies useful in the exploration of their personal beliefs, a degree in Cultural Studies with a concentration in Religious Studies shall also adopt a pluralistic perspective that examines multiple schools of religious thought, including critiques of religion itself, reflecting the tacit understanding that no tradition has exclusive access to religious truth, however that is defined.

Religious Studies concentrations at both the Associates and Bachelor's level should address the following:

Theories that define religion

Learning outcome: Evaluate theories that define the phenomenon of religion by     analyzing recurring religious themes, patterns, structures, language and practices;

    identifying and analyzing core components such as deity, cosmogony, theodicy and

    ethics; and critically examining the significance of sacred texts, scriptures, traditions,

    rituals and devotional practices.

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • RELI-2025 Introduction to Religious Studies

 

Religious traditions

Learning outcome: Investigate traditions from at least two of the following categories:

  • religions of “The Book” (Judaism, Christianity, Islam)
  • scriptural Asian religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism)
  • indigenous Asian religions (Shintoism, Bonism, Shamanism)
  • North and/or South American native religions
  • African and/or African diaspora religions.

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • RELI-3998 Religious Thought in World Perspective
  • HIST-1080 History of World Religions

Courses that partially meet this guideline include (to fully meet this guidelines at least two of these areas must be addressed)

    for religions of "The Book"  
  • HIST-3260 History of Christianity
  • RELI-1122 Introduction to the Bible
  • RELI-2122 New Testament Survey
  • RELI-3122 The Gospels and Letters of John
  • RELI-3122 Luke-Acts
  • RELI-4122 The Religious Thought of Paul
  • RELI-4127 The Apocalypse of John Reconsidered
    for scriptural/indigenous/Asian religions
  • HIST-1090 Pre-Modern East Asia
  for North and/or South American native religions  
  • INDG-3015 First Peoples of North America
 for African and/or African diaspora religions  
  • HIST-3010/CUST-3167 African History & Culture

    

Theoretical foundations of allied disciplines

 

Learning outcome: Understand theoretical foundations of at least two academic

    disciplines that support the pluralistic study of religion, such as anthropology, art,

    philosophy, history, literature, political science, psychology, or sociology.

Courses that partially meet this guideline include (to fully meet this guideline at least two areas need to be addressed):

    for anthropology  
  • ANTH-1010 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
  • ANTH-1015 Survey of Ancient Civilizations
  for arts  
  • ARTS-1050 Humanities Through the Arts
  • ARTS-2020 Art History: Prehistory to Renaissance
  • ARTS-2025 Art History II
  • ARTS-4010 Art History: A Study of Cultures
  • ARTS-1130 Western Art History Survey I
  • ARTS-3134 Art & Civilization
   for cultural studies  
  • CUST-2010 Introduction to Culture
  for history  
  • HIST-1070 Global History from 1500
  • HIST-1075 Global History to 1500
  • HIST-1115 Western Civilization I
  • HIST-2025 US History to 1865
  • HIST-2030 US History 1865 to Present
 for political science
  • POLI-4010 Global Perspectives on Political Theory
  • POLI-3005 America's Founding Ideas
   for literature  
  • LITR-1005 Introduction to Literature
 for philosophy  
  • PHIL-2005 Introduction to Philosophy
 for psychology  
  • PSYC-1005 Introduction to Psychology
 for sociology  
  • SOCI-1005 Exploring Society: Sociology
  • SOCI-2010 Intro Race Class and Gender
  • SOSC-3015 Great Conversations in Social Thought

     

Religious Studies concentrations at the Bachelor's level should also address the following:

Comparison of religious traditions

Learning outcome: Compare traditions from at least three of the following categories:

  • religions of “The Book” (Judaism, Christianity, Islam)
  • scriptural Asian religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism)
  • indigenous Asian religions (Shintoism, Bonism, Shamanism)
  • North and/or South American native religions
  • African and/or African diaspora religions.

Courses that meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • RELI-3998 Religious Thought in World Perspective
Critical issues

Learning outcome: Investigate and compare critical issues in religious studies. Such issues might include but are not limited to:

  • the place of religion in societies both as an institution and as an ethical and/or moral authority
  • how diverse traditions account for male and female roles
  • the role of religions as a political force from both historical and contemporary perspectives.

Courses that meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)  

  • RELI-3998 Religious Thought in World Perspective
  • RELI-4005 Comparative Religious Ethics
  • SOCI-3135 Religion in the US Today
  • HIST-3260 History of Christianity
  • HIST-3100 American Religious History I
  • HIST-3242 American Religious History II
  • HIST-3415 Renaissance and Reformation
  • HIST-3490 The Enlightenment

 

Concentration in  World Languages

Studies in world languages (e.g., ASL, French, Italian, Spanish, etc.) aim to foster cross-national and cross-cultural understanding and to facilitate the development of skills associated with language acquisition, such as speaking, writing, reading and listening. These skills are particularly important in the 21st century, when local and world cultures are increasingly intertwined. Indeed, linguistic and cultural competency opens numerous opportunities to experience and contribute to globalization and enhances learners’ professional and personal growth.  

World Languages concentrations should address the following general guidelines:

Language skills

Learning Outcome: demonstrate the ability to use resources in the target language and to access cultural information

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • SPAN 3015 Advanced Spanish: Language and Culture
  • SPAN 3010 Spanish for Health Care Professionals: Advanced
  • SPAN 3005 Advanced Spanish Composition
  • SPAN 4020 Spanish Avant-Garde(s): Painting, Literature, Film
  • SPAN 3020  Civilizations of Spanish Speaking World

Attitude

Learning outcome: demonstrate an inquiring and open-minded attitude when faced with otherness

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • LING 3020 Language and Culture
  • SPAN 3030 Latinx in the US  
  • SPAN 3025 Contemporary Spanish American Theater

Language and Literature: in their studies of world languages, students might want to focus on literature or language.

 Literature:

    If the focus is in literature, students’ programs should address the following guidelines:

Literary knowledge  

Learning Outcome: demonstrate an understanding of the literary, cultural, and political contexts of literature in the target language

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • SPAN 3025 Contemporary Spanish American Theater
  • SPAN 4005 Contemporary Latin American Literature
  • SPAN 4015 Jorge Luis Borges
  • SPAN 4020 Spanish Avant-Garde(s): Literature, Painting, Film
Linguistic knowledge

Learning Outcome: demonstrate advanced-level knowledge of the target language and/or familiarity with  theories of second language acquisition

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • SPAN 4010 History of Spanish Language
  • LING 4030 Foreign Language Pedagogy
  • LING 4010 Second Language Acquisition
Historical/Cultural knowledge

Learning Outcome: demonstrate advanced-level knowledge of the civilization or history that focuses on the region where the target language is spoken

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • SPAN 3030 Latinx in the US  
  • SPAN 3020 Civilizations of the Spanish Speaking World

Language:

    If the focus is in language, students’ programs should address the following guidelines:

Linguistic knowledge

Learning Outcome: demonstrate knowledge of linguistic theory,  the structure of the target language in the context of linguistic theory and/or familiarity with  theories of second language acquisition

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • SPAN 4010 History of Spanish Language
  • LING 1005 Introduction to Linguistics
  • LING 3020 Language and Culture
  • LING 4010 Second Language Acquisition
  • LING 4030 Foreign Language Pedagogy
Language skills

Learning Outcome: demonstrate advanced-level language and linguistics skills in the target language

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • SPAN 3005 Advanced Spanish Composition
  • SPAN 3015 Advanced Spanish: Language & Culture
  • SPAN 3010 Spanish for Health Care Professionals: Advanced
 Historical/Cultural knowledge

Learning Outcome: demonstrate advanced-level knowledge of the civilization or history that focuses on the region where the target language is spoken

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • SPAN 3020 Civilizations of the Spanish Speaking World
  • SPAN 3030 Latinx in the US  

 

Concentration in Writing

Expository Writing

Concentrations in expository writing generally reflect a competency-based program that enables students to become more effective writers of expository prose. It is a program of studies for students who have mastered:

  • basic lower-division writing skills, including correct use of grammar, diction, punctuation, sentence and paragraph structures
  • clarity, coherence and concreteness in the development of thought.

 Well-developed concentrations in expository writing should address the following guidelines:

 Theory

Learning Outcome: demonstrate an understanding of at least one of rhetoric, grammar, logic, style, or linguistics

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

  • COMW 1010 Grammar for Academic Writing
  • COMW 2005 Effective Academic Writing
  • COMW 2020 Research Writing
  • COMW 2025 Arguments in Academic Writing
  • COMW 3006 Research Writing: Advanced

 

History

Learning Outcome: demonstrate an understanding of the development of the English language either through linguistic or literary studies

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

 

  •     LING 1005 Introduction to Linguistics
  •     LING 3005 Introduction to Pragmatics
  •     LITR 2010 American Literature 1600-1865
  •     LITR 2015 American Literature 1865-Present
  •     LITR 3040 Jane Austen
  •     LITR 3062 British Literature to 1798
  •     LITR 3065 Literature of the American Renaissance
  •     LITR 3075 Literature and Culture of the Vampire
  •     LITR 3095 Shakespeare
  •     LITR 3141 Modern American Literature
  •     LITR 3192 20th Century American Literature

Practice

Learning outcome: demonstrate advanced-level facility in the writing of expository prose, professional writing and research

Courses that partially meet this guideline include (to fully meet this guideline at least two areas need to be addressed):

 

  •     Communication through New Media
  •     News & Feature Writing
  •     Reading & Writing the Essay
  •     Political Communications
  •     Advanced Public Relations
  •     Proposal Writing and Logical Argument
  •     Research Writing: Advanced
  •     Speechwriting
  •     Technical Writing
  •     Contemporary Food Writing
  •     Proposal Writing
  •     Creative Nonfiction: Advanced

While much of the work in the concentration should include practice in expository writing, the degree program could reflect a broad range of cultural studies in other liberal arts and sciences, including studies that will give students the opportunity to write in subject areas in the humanities and social sciences.

 

Creative Writing

Concentrations in creative writing generally include studies that will focus on the form, structure and uses of language as it is applied to fiction, poetry or drama. For disciplinary concentrations in creative writing, major emphasis will be placed on the practice of writing with supporting attention to theoretical and historical studies.

Creative writing is a competency-based concentration which should address:

Theory

Learning outcome: demonstrate an understanding of critical theory, particularly in the student's genre of primary interest

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to):

  •     LITR 2035 Exploring the Disciplines: Literature
  •     LITR 3049 Literary Theory
  •     LITR 3050 Literary Interpretation as a Method of Inquiry
History

Learning outcome: demonstrate an appreciation of at least one literary genre in historical perspective through the study of literary texts, major authors or literary criticism

Courses which meet this guideline include (but are not limited to)

 

  •     LITR 2010 American Literature 1600-1865
  •     LITR 2015 American Literature 1865-Present
  •     LITR 3040 Jane Austen
  •     LITR 3062 British Literature to 1798
  •     LITR 3065 Literature of the American Renaissance
  •     LITR 3075 Literature and Culture of the Vampire
  •     LITR 3095 Shakespeare
  •     LITR 3141 Modern American Literature
  •     LITR 3192 20th Century American Literature
Practices

Learning outcome: demonstrate facility in writing fiction, poetry or drama.

Courses that partially meet this guideline include (to fully meet this guideline at least two areas need to be addressed):

 

  •     Any CRWR course

     

 

Applicable Legislation and Regulations

Related References, Policies, Procedures, Forms and Appendices