Social Science Area of Study Guidelines for Students Matriculated On or After September 1, 2021

Social Science Area of Study Guidelines for Students Matriculated On or After September 1, 2021

Sponsor:

School of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Contact:

Department Chair, Social Science and Public Affairs

Category:

Academic

Number:

100.

Effective Date:

09/01/2021

Implementation History:

Keywords:

Social Science

Background Information:

Purpose

Definitions

Statements

The Social Science area of study includes a variety of academic disciplines and approaches. Social science traditions explore a range of social, political and economic issues. Students who develop programs in Social Science examine theories, methods, problems and solutions in their chosen concentrations. Students who develop degrees in Social Science develop the capacity to think critically about the social world and act as informed citizens and community members.

Bachelor’s Degree programs in Social Science must meet the six foundations listed below, while Associate Degree programs are required to meet the first three. 

Degrees in Social Science include the following six foundations:

  1. Broad Social Perspective
  2. Historical and Comparative Perspectives 
  3. Perspectives on Power and Privilege
  4. Theoretical Perspectives
  5. Social Science Research Methods
  6. Critical Thinking and Analysis  

These foundations may be met through transcript credit; college-level knowledge demonstrated through individual prior learning assessment (iPLA), professional learning evaluations (PLE), or credit by examination; or individual courses, a series of courses, or components within individual courses with Empire State College. The student’s Degree Program Rationale Essay should clearly explain how the degree plan meets each of the foundations in the concentration, what will be learned, and how the student will build on these foundations to meet personal, academic, or career goals.

Foundation # 1:  Broad Social Science Perspective

In relation to their chosen topics, questions or problems:

  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to define Social Science vocabulary, questions and topics.
  • Learning Outcome: Students will be able to examine relationships among different elements of social life (e.g., institutions, systems of belief, cultural patterns, or political and economic structures of society).

Foundation # 2: Historical and Comparative Perspectives

  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to describe how key elements of social life vary across time, place and culture.

Foundation # 3: Perspectives on Power and Privilege

  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to examine the dynamics of power and privilege in relation to race, class, gender, age, sexuality, etc.

Foundation # 4: Theoretical Perspectives

In relation to their chosen topics, questions or problems:

  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to define relevant concepts and theories.
  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to analyze the strengths, limitations and significance of relevant concepts and theories.

Foundation # 5: Social Science Research Methods

In relation to their chosen topics, questions or problems:

  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to define tools and methods used in Social Science research.
  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to analyze strengths and limitations of Social Science research methodologies.
  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to analyze ethical issues embedded in Social Science research.

Foundation # 6: Critical Thinking and Analysis

In relation to their chosen topics, questions or problems:

  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to evaluate key concepts, assumptions, theories and research from a Social Science perspective.

For details about the academic planning process and requirements, please see the Student Degree Planning Guide.  

 

 

 

 

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