Educational Studies Degree Guidelines for Associate of Arts and Associate of Science/Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science For Students Matriculated On or After September 1, 2021

Educational Studies Degree Guidelines for Associate of Arts and Associate of Science/Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science For Students Matriculated On or After September 1, 2021

Sponsor:

School of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Contact:

Department Chair, Educational Studies

Category:

Academic

Number:

100.

Effective Date:

09/01/2021

Implementation History:

Keywords:

Educational Studies

Background Information:

Purpose

Definitions

Statements

Introduction to Educational Studies

There is an increasing need for individuals who can help others both learn new things and apply what they know in various settings. Students who choose to design a degree program in educational studies have careers in diverse settings including training, teaching in certain settings or contexts, researching, and policymaking.

As a student in educational studies, you will examine the processes involved in teaching and learning through courses that examine topics such as learning theories or the social context of learning, as well as be exposed to practical applications such as technology in the classroom and curriculum development. Through your examination of current issues, innovations and research, you will build a foundation of historical, philosophical, sociological, political, and multicultural and gender perspectives in relation to education. You will sharpen your skills in writing and research and critical reading and thinking, as, together with a faculty mentor, you create a program to meet your specific needs and goals.

Note: A degree in Educational Studies from Empire State College does not lead to teacher certification at the undergraduate level. Students intending to go on for teacher certification should follow-up with their mentor. All students need to submit a Teacher Disclaimer form.

Program Guidelines:

Bachelor’s Degree programs in Educational Studies must meet the 10 foundations listed below, while Associate Degree programs are required to meet at least 5 foundations (the first five are recommended). Students will explain how they meet each relevant learning outcome in their rationale essay. Knowledge of each outcome can be demonstrated through transcript credit, individual prior learning assessment (iPLA), prior learning evaluation (PLE), or credit by examination, or specific courses at Empire State College. While many students will take one or more courses for each foundation, some courses may meet more than one foundation.

The concentrations in Educational Studies begin with the 10 foundations which prepare the student for more advanced-level work. Students who wish to concentrate in a specific area should review the concentration guidelines below to guide course selection.

Foundation # 1: Professional standards

Learning outcome: Students will be able to define professional standards including ethics related to the chosen concentration.

Foundation # 2: Foundational knowledge

Learning outcome: Students will be able to analyze the foundational knowledge of the field from either a historical or philosophical perspective, grounding them in the chosen concentration.

Foundation # 3: Human development

Learning outcome: Students will be able to interpret stages of human development appropriate to the chosen concentration.

Please note: A lifespan course in human development is recommended. Students planning to work with a specific age group are strongly encouraged to undertake further study in that specific developmental stage to demonstrate breadth and depth. For example, students could take Human Development at the introductory level followed by Infant and Toddler Development, Child Development, or Adolescent Development at the advanced level depending on their focus.

Foundation # 4: Social contexts of learning

Learning outcome: Students will be able to illustrate the sociological perspective of learning including the relationships between home, school, and community.

Foundation # 5: Curricular design, instructional strategies, and assessment

Learning outcome: Students will be able to analyze comprehensive curriculum design appropriate to the concentration.

Foundation # 6: Language and literacy development

Learning outcome: Students will be able to analyze language and literacy development appropriate to the concentration.

Foundation # 7: Learners and learning

Learning outcome: Students will be able to critically analyze knowledge of learners and the theoretical approaches that support the learning process.

Foundation # 8: Uses of technology

Learning outcome: Students will be able to evaluate the appropriate use of technology in teaching and learning and evaluate its effectiveness in applied situations appropriate to the concentration.

Foundation # 9: Diversity

Learning outcome: Students will be able to analyze the impact and importance of human diversity, the impact of individual and collective power, privilege, and oppression, and potential implications for educational settings.

Foundation # 10: Methods of Inquiry

Learning outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate skills in locating, evaluating, and critically thinking about research related to the chosen field.

Concentration Guidelines

Concentrations in Educational Studies begin with the ten foundations which prepare the student for more advanced-level work. Courses should be selected from those areas which are most relevant to the specific concentration design and to the specific organizing framework. In planning the concentration, consideration should be given to both the depth and breadth of knowledge. Students wishing to pursue individualized concentrations should use the general area of study guidelines as an organizing framework for their degree plans. Specific guidelines have been developed for a concentration core in the following areas:

Early Childhood Studies

Make a difference in the lives of young children and their families with a concentration in early childhood studies. This concentration is designed for students who wish to provide high-quality early learning for all young children, birth through age 8, in formal and informal settings such as childcare, Head Start, and private preschool programs. By connecting early childhood practice, policy, and research, students will be prepared to serve as leaders in this exciting field. Within the 10 essential foundations, students in Early Childhood Studies should specify in their rationale essay how they met the following objectives within their concentration of early childhood studies:

  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to define professionalism including ethics and the NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct.
  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to interpret stages of human development with emphasis on birth through age 8.

Please note: A minimum of one developmental course is expected, and it’s highly recommended that students also include HUDV 2035 Attachment in Early Childhood and/or HUDV 4015 Development and Meaning Play.

  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to analyze comprehensive curriculum design that supports learning standards with an emphasis on curriculum and environments that support play.

Please note: A minimum of one course related to curriculum is expected and it’s highly recommended that students also include HUDV 4015 Development and Meaning Play.

  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to analyze language and literacy development from birth through age 8 that includes a family literacy component.
  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to evaluate the appropriate use of technology in teaching and learning from birth through age 8.
  • Learning outcome: Student will be able to demonstrate skills in locating, evaluating, and critically thinking about research related to their field including observation and assessment of children birth through age 8.

Educational Technology

Technological tools are as common to the modern educational experience as paper and pencil.  From preschool programs to high schools and beyond, we see the incorporation of digital aids increasing our abilities to teach and learn. The mere presence of technology does not achieve learning goals. Students who choose to concentrate in Educational Technology will embark on a journey to understand the many dimensions of digital tools so that they can employ them in an informed and purposeful way across variety of settings to meet learning outcomes. Within the 10 foundations, students in Educational Technology should specify in their rationale essay how they met the following objectives within their concentration of educational technology:

  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to define professionalism in the field including a knowledge of relevant standards in areas such as cyber ethics and digital citizenship.
  • Learning outcome: Student will be able to analyze the foundational knowledge of the field from either a historical or philosophical perspective, exploring the impact of technology in the classroom-on-classroom transformation.
  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to analyze comprehensive curriculum design that supports learning standards with an emphasis on instructional desig in virtual environments.
  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to interpret relevant standards and expectations for digital literacy including digital fluency and the impact of computing and computational thinking.
  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to evaluate the appropriate use of technology in teaching and learning demonstrating both breadth and depth.

Students with Exceptionalities

The Students with Exceptionalities concentration is for those who have a passion for creating equitable and just environments for diverse learners within educational settings. Students who select this concentration are committed to enhancing the learning of students with exceptionalities and will find opportunities to expand their own knowledge and develop skills and proficiency through courses, applied practices, and research. Students will also explore topics of particular interest in their own practice through action research projects and directed readings. In addition to the 10 foundations, students should specify in their rationale essay how they gained the specific knowledge of the following objectives:

  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to define professionalism in the field     including the Council for Exceptional Children’s (CEC) Ethical Principles and Professional Practice Guidelines for special educators.
  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to analyze the foundational knowledge of     the field from either a historical or philosophical perspective, including the history of disability in America, and the historical and current legislation that support students with exceptionalities.
  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to interpret stages of human development with emphasis on human exceptionalities.
  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to analyze comprehensive curriculum design that supports learning standards for inclusive learning environments with emphasis on evidence-based practices.
  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to analyze language and literacy development including research and practice for children with exceptionalities.
  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to evaluate the appropriate use of technology in teaching and learning, with an emphasis on assistive technology.

Child Care Administration

Become a leader as an administrator of children’s programs that make a difference in the lives of young children and their families with a concentration in Child Care Administration. This concentration is designed for students who wish to develop and/or lead high-quality early learning programs for all young children, birth through age 8, in formal and informal settings such as childcare and private preschool programs.

Please Note: For a concentration in Child Care Administration, students are expected to meet the first 4 learning outcomes listed below. The 5th learning outcome is optional, but is required for students who wish to apply for the Children’s Program Administration Credential.

  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to define professionalism from the perspective of an administrator including the principles and responsibilities fundamental to professionals working with children, families, staff, and the community.
  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to Summarize the administration of an effective organizational structure for children’s programs including personnel and human resource management.
  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to analyze various professional practices associated with children’s programs including curriculum development, design of the learning environment, and program assessment and evaluation.
  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to assess the critical nature of financial planning and budgeting and the process for children’s educational programs.
  • Learning outcome: Students will be able to demonstrate breadth and depth through the integration of the information and principles and practices of children’s program administration.

Applicable Legislation and Regulations

Related References, Policies, Procedures, Forms and Appendices