Course Descriptions

The Adirondack Residency courses are 4 credits, unless otherwise noted. Students may register for one course from Section A and one course from Section B.

To view the course descriptions, click the title.

Section A Courses

ECON 3020/CRN 84292 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Duncan RyanMann Ph.D.

This advanced level economics course is open to all students and is also part of the Business and Environmental Sustainability Certificate. Ecological economics is a relatively new field that tries to incorporate fundamental resource constraints, scientific principles including the second law of thermodynamics and environmental problems into thinking about the economy, markets and policy. Much of the focus is on systems, global perspectives, and long run concerns. Several areas will be investigated in depth including externalities, public goods, and policies for dealing with these issues. Students can explore specific problems and possible remedies in areas such as water and air quality, energy consumption, transportation, biodiversity, or recycling in detail. 

Prerequisites: An understanding of basic microeconomics

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
yes, social sciences

HIST 3197/CRN 84670 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Peggy Lynn

Students will examine the evolution of the pursuit of walking in wilderness areas in the US. Students will discover and discuss the roots of outdoor recreation as it stemmed from forestry and farming, and also in response to industrialization. They will identify and describe leaders in guiding, trail blazing, equipment development, and founding organizations which advocate for the pursuit of hiking, the interests of hikers, and wilderness preservation. Students will compare and contrast various time periods and regions and the conservation and preservation efforts in them. They will critically examine the tourism industry surrounding hiking, its advantages in promoting a healthy outdoor exercise, and its disadvantages in the resulting overcrowding and erosion of trails.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
yes, American History

ENST 3015/CRN 84556 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Drew Monthie

This course looks at the historical and cultural botanical practices of the Iroquois peoples who inhabit NY State and the surrounding region and the botanical interactions that occurred before and after European contact. Students will analyze the traditional ecological knowledge (Ethnoecology, TEK) of the Iroquois culture and how Native peoples utilized both indigenous and non-native species of plants for everyday life. Students will also develop hypothesizes of the potential implications for modern culture, medicine and biocultural diversity. Students will also collect and analyze data pertaining to phytochemistry: the chemical composition of plants. 

Prerequisites: BIOL 2204 Ethnobotany or BIOL 2002 Populations and Diseases or BIOL 1200 Biology I or ENSC 1006 Introduction to Ecology and Sustainability.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
yes, natural sciences

PHOT 1040/CRN 81604 introductory, liberal
Instructor: Terry Boddie

The ability of photography to document the human impact on the natural environment over the past several decades has created a vast body of images that has made us more aware of the danger that this intrusion has created for future generations. The work of photographers and artists such as Edward Burtynsky, Vik Muniz and others has shifted the dialogue from one of observation of the consequence of this human impact to a dialog about how things can be corrected.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
yes, arts

Section B Courses

HIST 3655/CRN 84756 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Kate Dermody

This course will examine the history of the Adirondacks through the lens of a critical paradox: how can humans preserve our natural beauty while allowing public access to these places? The course will first investigate the pull factors and industries of the Adirondacks and the effects on the conservation movements. Students will read William H.H. Murray’s writings and explore historical promotional images of the Adirondacks. This class will also investigate the pull factors and industries of the Adirondacks, and the effects on the conservation movements. Students will explore the future of conservation and tourism of the Adirondacks.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
yes, American History

MUSC 3122/CRN 81609 advanced, liberal 
Instructor: Peggy Lynn

Students will learn about the history and culture of the Adirondack region by reading stories and poems and listening to traditional and original songs. They will examine the forms of writing and the emotional connection in Adirondack folklore. From ballads of lumber camps to tall tales of explorers and sportsmen, the songs and stories of this wilderness region express a singular style of humor and impart values of work ethic and rugged individualism. Students will appreciate the inspiration behind the message and examine the artistic expression of singing and storytelling.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
yes, arts

ENSC 3202/CRN 84540, advanced, liberal
Instructor: Nikki Shrimpton, Ph.D.

Forest Ecology is a branch of the ecological sciences which focuses on species, species populations, and species communities that inhabit forest ecosystems. Students examine forest ecosystem dynamics, as they explore forest ecosystems around the world. Students consider the impacts human activities have had on global forests, in terms of conservation, restoration, and deforestation. Topics covered include biodiversity, climate and climate change-influences on forest distribution, dendrochronology, ecological disturbance, endemism, extinction, evolution, fire ecology, fragmentation and urbanization, invasive species, migration, soil ecology, sustainability, and vegetation dynamics.

Prerequisites: Biology I, Biology of Ecosystems, Environmental Science, Ecology, or equivalent.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

BIOL 2210/CRN 80840 introductory, liberal
Instructor: Kevin Woo, Ph.D.

In this course, students will learn about the behavioral ecology and evolution of animals, and understand how they experience their perceptual world and navigate the ecological challenges that allowed them to survive or become extinct. Students will be introduced to the core conceptual, theoretical, and applied aspects in the interdisciplinary field of animal behavior. In particular, they will examine various topics in this field, such as communication, mate selection, sexual selection, neuroethology, cultural transmission, learning, and personality.

Prerequisites: Introductory Biology or Introductory Psychology (PSYC 1005) Note: Students taking this residency course should not also take Animal Behavior (BIOL 2208).

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
yes, natural sciences