Course Descriptions

Fall Session “A” Courses

Global Health Preparedness: This course offers a global perspective on the health and development in developing countries, along with the health needs of poor and disadvantaged people. Students will learn about the burden and distribution of disease and mortality; the determinants of global health disparities; the making of global health policies; and the outcomes of global health interventions.

Mass Disasters: Implications for Public Policy: This course explores the consequences of federal, state, and local policy decisions on the way that emergency managers carry out their work. An understanding of these consequences can help the emergency manager or policy analyst be an advocate for policies that help communities mitigate, plan and prepare for, respond to, and recover from natural and human-caused disasters. Students will draw policy lessons from studying a variety of disasters, large and small, that have occurred over the past several decades. Topics include federalism and inter-governmental relations and their connection to disaster planning and response, community resilience in recovery, and the legal and ethical obligations of the emergency management profession, among others. This course was previously CHS-264854 Mass Disasters: Implications for Public Policy.

Fall Session “B” Courses

Emergency Services Management: This course will introduce students to the administrative roles and functions within the fire and emergency service organization. We will examine the roles and responsibilities of administrators, management and leadership theory and practice, and common administrative functions. Some of the areas of study include: Emergency operations; human resource, policy and procedures; financial management; quality improvement; use of information technology; risk management; and safety and wellness programs.

Hazardous Materials and Public Awareness: This course will introduce students to the administrative roles and functions within the fire and emergency service organization.  We will examine the roles and responsibilities of administrators, management and leadership theory and practice and common administrative functions.  Some of the areas of study include: Emergency operations; human resource, policy and procedures; financial management; quality improvement; use of information technology; risk management; and safety and wellness programs.

Interagency Coordination and Cooperation: The course will examine the inter-agency issues that cause problems in the emergency management field. The study will embrace the manner in which different agencies have different traditions that sometimes make cooperation difficult.

Understanding Terrorist Groups: This course examines the evolution of the phenomenon of terrorism, which has (re)emerged as a lead feature of contemporary international relations. It addresses the questions of definition of terrorism, history of the concept, perspectives on causes, structure and organization of terrorist groups, relationship to the debate on the changing face of warfare, and the consequences of terrorism. The approach blends historical and comparative perspectives and a practical outlook on international policies, seeking to differentiate between varying forms of terrorism in relation to the political and societal context from which they originate and the differing domestic, regional, and international responses they generate.

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