Fall Course Descriptions

To view the course description, click on the title.

HUSV 3005 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Heidi Nightengale

Advocacy in Human Services explores the definitions and the nature of advocacy as a process and strategy for change. Student will examine case, cause, administrative and legislative advocacy approaches while considering historical perspectives. This course is aligned with the Community and Human Services Area of Study guidelines for Skills and Application and Integration. This course is aligned with the B.S. in Addiction Studies program guidelines for Assessment & Education and Application and Integration.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

BUSN 3010 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Dr. Nicholas Boccolucci

This course is designed to facilitate an understanding of philosophy of ethics and ethical decision-making process. The course emphasizes the overall philosophies, theories, and concepts of moral reasoning in making informed ethical decisions in various areas of business and business management.

Prerequisites: Principles of Management or equivalent management knowledge.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
yes, humanities

HUSV 4020, advanced, liberal
Instructor: Sara Stockton

The purpose of this course is to help students develop self awareness about their perceptions and biases, and how these may impact their work within the helping profession. Students will critically analyze power differentials including race, class, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, ability, and how these forces overlap and influence practice. This course is aligned with the Community and Human Services Area of Study guidelines for Diversity. This course is aligned with the B.S. in Addiction Studies program guidelines for Diversity.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements? 
no

HRMS 3010 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Frances Boyce

This course will examine the issues, challenges, and opportunities presented by diversity in the workplace. Issues related to employee diversity, in terms of gender, race/ethnicity, career development, and cultural background are emphasized. The objective is to broaden students' perspectives about the dynamics of diversity and to help them work more effectively in diverse workplace environments. Diversity is a workplace characteristic; inclusion is a workplace value. The course examines ways in which the organization benefits from an environment that values, welcomes and includes all employees.

Prerequisites: Principles of Management (MGMT-1005), or equivalent. Note: Management knowledge acquired through workplace or other types of organizational experiences may fulfill the prerequisite. 

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

ECON 2005 introductory, liberal (4cr.)
Instructor: Dr. Duncan RyanMann

This course provides an overview of micro and macro economic issues. In microeconomics students examine individual decision-making in firms and households and the way they interact in markets. In the macroeconomic portion of the course students learn about the aggregate economy including GDP, inflation, growth, unemployment and interest rates. Major macroeconomic policies and policy issues are considered.

This 4-credit micro and macro economics course covers a more limited range of topics than are included in either the 6-credit version of this course or the 4-credit courses in microeconomics and macroeconomics.

Prerequisites: An understanding of graphs and basic mathematical concepts.

Students should not take this course if they already have taken either microeconomics or macroeconomics. If students need a full course in microeconomics and macroeconomics they should either take the 6-credit version of this course or take both microeconomics (4-credits) and macroeconomics (4-credits). This 4-credit micro and macro economics course covers a more limited range of topics than are included in either the 6-credit version of this course or the 4-credit courses in microeconomics and macroeconomics.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
yes, social sciences

ECON 2010 introductory, liberal (6cr.)
Instructor: Duncan RyanMann

This course provides an overview of micro and macro economic issues. In microeconomics students examine individual decision-making in firms and households and the way they interact in markets. In the macroeconomics portion of the course students learn about the aggregate economy including GDP, inflation, growth, unemployment and interest rates. Major macroeconomic policies and policy issues are considered.

Prerequisites: An understanding of graphs and basic mathematical concepts.

Students should not take this course if they already have taken either microeconomics or macroeconomics. This course is appropriate for students who need at least three credits of microeconomics and three credits of macroeconomics in their degrees. This course covers all of the material in the four credit version of micro and macro economics plus additional topics and issues in both microeconomics and macroeconomics that are not covered in the four credit version of the course. This course provides less comprehensive coverage of microeconomics or macroeconomics than the separate 4-credit courses in microeconomics and macroeconomics.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
yes, social sciences

ARTS 3125 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Dr. Susan Forbes

This is an advanced study of global art history--styles and aesthetics of the visual and performing arts including theatre, dance, music, drawing, painting, sculpture, architecture, photographic, and digital arts. Consideration of the cultural, political, social, economic and institutional influences on artists and human creativity will be addressed. Additional discussion of the creative process inherent within any specific art form and the elements and tools used to create art will be included. The student will consider the role and function and meaning of the arts in various cultures around the world. The purpose is to give an advanced understanding of the arts throughout the history of humanity, especially in Non-Western Civilizations.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
yes, arts and other world civilizations

COMW 2010 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Peggy Lynn

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the techniques and procedures of researching funding opportunities and writing grant applications. Students will have the opportunity to practice writing grant applications under the supervision of the mentor.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
yes, basic communication

FILM 1010 introductory, liberal
FILM 3030 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Dr. Cynthia (Cindy) Bates

In this course, students will consider some of the Harry Potter books as literature. They will then consider how these specific books were adapted into films for international audiences. Students will also look at how Harry Potter has become a marketing sensation by investigating how Harry Potter souvenirs, parties, costumes and more have become common household items for so many people. Lastly, students will study the Harry Potter Theme Parks in Orlando and London. Throughout the term, students will consider the impact of Harry Potter on the literary and entertainment industries and on US culture as a whole.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
yes, arts or humanities

HIST 3152, advanced, liberal
Instructor: Dr. Karen Garner

This course examines the development of, and debates about, U.S. social welfare institutions and policies. In particular, this course examines how social welfare philosophy, mission, and practice evolved from its original altruistic and voluntary roots to become professionalized and identified with casework rather than social reform. Topics of this course include: the origins and inspirations of social welfare programs and philosophy in the United States; the impact of the Civil War; the “Scientific Charity” Movement; the history and evolution of Child Welfare policy; the Settlement House Movement; the Great Depression and the origins and evolution of Social Security Policy; the Johnson Administration’s Great Society programs and War on Poverty; Welfare to Workfare in the 1970s; the state of social welfare in the USA today. This course combines critical reading, writing, and discussion to illuminate the elements of evidence, values, and interpretation in the study of social welfare history and to fulfill guidelines for the Historical Studies Area of Study. This course can provide Historical Perspectives for Community and Human Services degrees and Historical and Comparative Perspectives for Public Affairs degrees. It also includes coverage of the basic narrative of American history from the 1800s to the present, knowledge of U.S. government and private philanthropies and how their policies and practices have impacted the quality of life for diverse population groups, and how the U.S. social welfare practices compared and contrasted to Western European welfare practices.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements? 
yes, American history

HUSV 4030, advanced, liberal
Instructor: Dr. Anamaria Ross

The purpose of this course is to survey codified professional, legal, and ethical issues in community and human services. This course is aligned with the Community and Human Services Area of Study guidelines for Ethics and Application and Integration. This course is aligned with the B.S. in Addiction Studies program guidelines for Ethics. 

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

MGMT 3020 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Dr. Sewon Kim

The main objective of this course is to understand the management and leadership of successful business relationships between international business participants from different cultures. Topics include: the basics of culture and cultural theory; globalization and culture; problems of cross-cultural communication and negotiation; the impact of cross-cultural differences on business and management performance; working in cross cultural environments and on cross cultural teams; leadership across cultures; international business customs and protocol; and culturally sound strategies for organizational success in the global business context.

Prerequisites: Principles of Management (MGMT 1005), or equivalent. Highly Recommended (not required): Organizational Behavior (MGMT 3060) or Managerial Leadership or Human Resource Management (HRMS 3015), or equivalents.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

POLI 1005, introductory, liberal 
Instructor: Christopher Whann

Students will be introduced to the methods and basic principles of political science. This course will cover the major subfields of political science: national government, comparative politics, international relations, and political theory.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

ACCT 2005 introductory, non liberal
Instructor: Valerie Goodwin

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of financial accounting systems and principles, including financial statements preparation, interpretation and communication to external parties and managers. Among topics covered are: the accounting cycle for gathering, recording, summarizing, reporting and analyzing of accounting data. The course includes an overview of accounting for assets, liabilities, stockholders' equity, revenues and expenses including cash, investments, accounts receivable, inventories, plant assets and equipment, intangible assets and natural resources, short and long term liabilities, in addition to basic principles of internal control and the role of ethics in accounting profession. This course covers professional ethics and social responsibility in business. Students cannot count the credit for Accounting for Decision Makers in their degree plan if they also take Introductory Accounting I 'Financial' and/or Introductory Accounting II 'Managerial', since the course contents are similar. The course satisfies quantitative aspects of business.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements? 
no

 

ACCT 2010 introductory, non-liberal
Instructor: Valerie Goodwin

The course is designed to expand on the knowledge gained of financial accounting theory, accounting information systems cycles and concepts by focusing more in depth on the manufacturing environment and the use of accounting information for planning, controlling, and decision-making internally by the management and externally by other interested parties. It covers specialized financial reporting issues such as preparing, interpreting and using the statement of cash flows, financial statements analysis and budgeting, long and short-term financial investment and production decisions and other cost analysis concepts including incremental cost analysis, cost-volume-profit analysis techniques and incorporating the time value impact on financial and managerial decisions. This course covers professional ethics and social responsibility in business.

Prerequisites: Introductory Accounting I or equivalent. The course content is similar to, and more comprehensive than, Accounting for Decision Makers. Therefore, students cannot count the credit for both of these courses in their degree plan. The course satisfies quantitative aspects of business.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

MGMT 3025 advanced, non-liberal
Instructor: Hartley Hutchins

This course explores the theory and practice of effective leadership. Some of the topics students will explore include leadership theories, the nature of managing and leading, behavioral indicators of leadership and the complex nature of power and influence within organizations. 

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

COMM 3070 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Dr. Susan Forbes

Leadership Communication addresses theories, processes, forms and techniques of professional communication for leaders in all contexts. Students will explore issues of active listening, motivation, conflict resolution/mediation and interpersonal communication techniques as well as analyze communication situations and create effective communication in a variety of media. Students will be exposed to the power of persuasion, humor, vocal dynamics, physical energy, a strong message and the desire to communicate. Students will prepare oral presentations using PowerPoint or similar types of presentation tools. Prerequisites: Students should have basic computer and college level writing skills.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements? 
yes, basic communication

ENSC 3006 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Dr. Audeliz (Audi) Matias

As human populations continue to increase, the probability of human encounters with natural hazards such as hurricanes, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, flooding, mudslides, tornadoes, forest fires, blizzards, and tsunamis, also increases. This course explores the scientific processes behind natural disasters and examines the way disasters have impacted human populations-environmentally, culturally, economically, and politically-throughout history. The course will heighten students’ awareness of the impacts the natural environment can have on current human populations around the world and will also highlight many ways human activities have actually rendered human populations more vulnerable to natural disasters.

Prerequisites: Knowledge gained through an introductory earth science or environmental science study, or equivalent. Highly Recommended (not required): Students should demonstrate proficiency in writing or critical thinking skills.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
yes, natural sciences

MGMT 3060 advanced, non-liberal
Instructor: Dr. Roselynn Dow

This course in organizational behavior (OB) explores the sociological and psychological foundations of behavior in organizations and seeks to understand how the behavior exhibited by individuals and groups affects organizational structures, processes, and ultimately, performance and effectiveness. This course focuses on the core concepts, theories, and methods of human and of organizational behavior. Its main objective is to analyze, understand, and manage the development of complex and multifaceted contemporary organizational behavior. Topics include the changing environment of organization, foundation of individual behavior, motivation, communication, conflict and negotiation, power, politics, organizational justice, leadership, decision making and problem solving, organization culture, and organization change and development. This course meets the understanding people in an organizational context area of study guidelines for students in the business, management and economics area.

Prerequisites: Principles of Management (MGMT 1005), or equivalent.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

HUSV 4045, advanced, liberal
Instructor: Sara Stockton

This course will introduce students to the concepts of secondary traumatic stress, vicarious traumatization, countertransference, and burnout. The aim of the course is to help them assess their own vulnerabilities to secondary traumatic stress. The importance of self-awareness, supervision and work-home balance will integral to this study. Note: This course is aligned with the Community and Human Services Area of Study guidelines for Knowledge of Human Behavior, Skills, and Application and Integration.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

HUSV 3068, advanced, liberal
Instructor: Heidi Nightengale

The purpose of this course is to gain a working knowledge of social welfare policies in the United States focusing on both the historical and current context. Emphasis will be placed on connecting policy with practice. This course is aligned with the Community and Human Services Area of Study guidelines for Knowledge of Service Delivery and Skills.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Human Services is recommended.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

HUSV 3065, advanced, liberal
Instructor: Sara Stockton

This course will educate students about integrating spirituality into helping relationships. A skill set for the application of spirituality within a variety of practice settings will be developed. An understanding of the relevance and role of spirituality in the helping relationship will be established. Students will also learn about the challenges of introducing spirituality in practice settings, as well as with clients for whom spirituality may be uncomfortable or unfamiliar. This course is aligned with the Community and Human Services Area of Study guidelines for Knowledge of Human Behavior and Skills.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

MGMT 4035, advanced, liberal 
Instructor: Hartley Hutchins

This course is a capstone study for Business, Management & Economics students. It introduces the key concepts, tools, and principles of strategy formulation and competitive analysis. It is concerned with managerial decisions and actions that affect the performance and survival of business enterprises. The course is focused on the information, analyses, organizational processes, and skills and business judgment managers must use to devise strategies, position their businesses, define firm boundaries and maximize long-term profits in the face of uncertainty and competition. In studying strategy, the course draws together and builds on all the ideas, concepts, and theories from students' functional courses such as accounting, economics, finance, marketing, management, organizational behavior, and statistics.

Prerequisites: All of the core BME courses e.g. management, organizational behavior, accounting, economics, statistics, marketing, finance notes: The assumption is that students enrolling in Strategic Management are in their last enrollment and have successfully completed most of the BME requisite courses.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

HUSV 3132 advanced, liberal 
Instructor: Heidi Nightengale

The course will examine the complexities of poverty in America and how it may impact power, privilege, and oppression in human service institutions. The "framework" of poverty and how it impacts home, school, community and work will be examined. Finally, the course will examine how poverty effects human service interventions for individuals, families, professionals, and communities. This course aligns with the Community and Human Services area of study guidelines for Knowledge of Service Delivery and Diversity.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

MUSC 3040 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Peggy Lynn

The purpose of this course is to examine women’s songs, their messages, their genres, and the women who wrote, sang, and recorded them. The goal is for students to use critical thinking to evaluate women’s songs and their lyrics and relate them to American history. They will examine the way different chord structures, rhythms, melodies, instrumentation, and arrangement affect the mood set by a song. This course will encompass concepts of music history, women in American history, and feminist theory.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
yes, arts and American history

For Further Information Contact:

Lori McCaffrey
Collegewide Residency Coordinator

Lori.McCaffrey@esc.edu