Spring Course Descriptions

To view the course description, click on the title.

HUSV 3005 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Heidi Nightengale

Advocacy in Human Services explores the definitions and the nature of advocacy as a process and strategy for change. Student will examine case, cause, administrative and legislative advocacy approaches while considering historical perspectives. Note: This course is aligned with the Community and Human Services Area of Study guidelines for Skills and Application and Integration.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

BUSN 3010 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Dr. Nicholas Boccolucci

This study is designed to facilitate an understanding of philosophy of ethics and ethical decision-making process. The study emphasizes the overall philosophies, theories, and concepts of moral reasoning in making informed ethical decisions in various areas of business and business management.

Prerequisites: Principles of Management or equivalent management knowledge.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
yes, humanities

MRKT 4050 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Cory Kallet

Students will learn how to use contemporary learning theories and fundamental management and marketing concepts to guide their self- and career development. Throughout the course, students will engage in a series of learning activities aimed at developing, documenting, evaluating, peer-reviewing, presenting, and improving their practical self-management and self-marketing competencies and skills. They will learn how to use e-portfolios for conducting their personal SWOT analysis and self-assessment and will use social media tools to support their ongoing personal and professional development. Overall, this course will foster students’ self-awareness and self-reflection and will help them develop effective strategies for self-improvement and self-promotion. Prerequisites: “Introduction to Marketing” AND “Principles of Management” or equivalent knowledge. Course should be cross-listed in MKT (marketing), MGT (management) and EDU (educational studies). Although this course fully meets the 4 credit educational planning requirement, it does not deal with degree planning. If you have not yet designed your plan of studies in the college, you should contact your mentor to discuss the format you will use to design your degree plan (for example, if you need it, you may take a separate educational planning course).

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

COMW 3035 advanced, liberal 
Instructor: Dr. Elaine Handley

Food is the great common denominator in life: we all need it to survive and we spend considerable time growing it, shopping for it, preparing it, consuming it and thinking about it. In this study we will both read and write about food. By breaking food writing down into the genres of: essays, memoir, fiction, cookbooks and food criticism we will examine how food is written about and what attitudes, values and symbolism are inherent in our relationship with food and what that can teach us about our culture.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

CUST 4122 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Dr. Nadine Wedderburn

This study provides students with an opportunity to explore how Black women's experiences distinctively articulate negotiations of identity and belonging within transnational contexts. Using literary and cultural narratives, the study will pursue analyses of the construction of female subjectivity and draw attention to specialized knowledge created by Black women's experiences in political, cultural, social and economics terms - whether they occur in Africa, the Caribbean, North/Central/South America or Europe.

 

Meets  SUNY General Education requirements?
no

HRMS 3010 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Joel Goldberg

Issues related to employee diversity, in terms of gender, race/ethnicity, career development, and cultural background are emphasized. The objective is to broaden student’s perspectives about the dynamics of diversity and to help them work more effectively in diverse workplace environments. Diversity is a workplace characteristic; inclusion is a workplace value. The course examines ways in which the organization benefits from an environment that values, welcomes and includes all employees.

Prerequisites: Principles of Management or management knowledge acquired through workplace or other types of organizational experiences.


Meets Gen Ed requirements?
no

HIST 3125 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Susan Forbes

This is an advanced study of global art history--styles and aesthetics of the visual and performing arts including theatre, dance, music, drawing, painting, sculpture, architecture, photographic, and digital arts. Consideration of the cultural, political, social, economic and institutional influences on artists and human creativity will be addressed. Additional discussion of the creative process inherent within any specific art form and the elements and tools used to create art will be included. The student will consider the role and function and meaning of the arts in various cultures around the world. The purpose is to give an advanced understanding of the arts throughout the history of humanity, especially in Non-Western Civilizations.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements? 
yes, Arts

HLAD 4015 advanced, non-liberal
Instructor: Dr. Duncan RyanMann

This course will provide an overview of the United States healthcare policy process, including an analysis of the political, institutional, cultural and economic environments in which health policy is formed and modified over time. T Note: his course aligns with the Community and Human Services area of study guidelines for Knowledge of Service Delivery, Skills, and Application and Integration.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

 

HIST 3680 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Dr. Karen Garner

This course examines major themes and episodes that have shaped US foreign policy from 1939 to the present. It evaluates US involvement in selected foreign wars (World War II, Vietnam War, and the War on Terror) and highlights selected foreign relationships (with the Western democracies, Soviet Union/Russia, People’s Republic of China, Iran) and issues (economic and energy policies) that have impacted United States security and global standing in the world over the past 80 years.

 

Meets Gen Ed requirements? 
no

HIST 3152 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Dr. Karen Garner

This course examines the development of, and debates about, U.S. social welfare institutions and policies. In particular, this course examines how social welfare philosophy, mission, and practice evolved from its original altruistic and voluntary roots to become professionalized and identified with casework rather than social reform. Topics of this study include: the origins and inspirations of social welfare programs and philosophy in the United States; the impact of the Civil War; the “Scientific Charity” Movement; the history and evolution of Child Welfare policy; the Settlement House Movement; the Great Depression and the origins and evolution of Social Security Policy; the Johnson Administration’s Great Society programs and War on Poverty; Welfare to Workfare in the 1970s; the state of social welfare in the USA today. This course combines critical reading, writing, and discussion to illuminate the elements of evidence, values, and interpretation in the study of social welfare history and to fulfill guidelines for the Historical Studies Area of Study. This study can provide Historical Perspectives for Community and Human Services degrees and Historical and Comparative Perspectives for Public Affairs degrees. It also includes coverage of the basic narrative of American history from the 1800s to the present, knowledge of U.S. government and private philanthropies and how their policies and practices have impacted the quality of life for diverse population groups, and how the U.S. social welfare practices compared and contrasted to Western European welfare practices.

 

Meets Gen Ed requirements?
yes, American History

BIOL 1002 introductory, liberal
Instructor: Dr. Cathy Davison

This course provides an introduction to the theories, principles, and concepts of the biological sciences with an emphasis on human systems. The topics covered include the scientific method, basic biochemistry, cell structure and function; tissue organization; homeostasis and feedback systems; the structure and function of body systems; genetics and inheritance; and evolutionary theory. This study does not meet the guidelines for Biology concentrations.

Meets Gen Ed requirements? 
yes, natural sciences

HRMS 3015 advanced, non-liberal
Instructor: Joel Goldberg

Students will examine the human resource management function and related activities. The course focuses on the strategic importance of this function for effective management and organizational success. Students will analyze the relationships among organizational strategies and HR policies/procedures. Topics include: job analysis and design, recruitment and selection, compensation and motivation, training and development, employee rights and discipline, and labor-management relations. Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Principles of Management (MGMT_1005), or equivalent This course was previously BME-213504 Human Resource Management and Development.

Meets Gen Ed requirements?
no

BUSN 4030 advanced, non-liberal
Instructor: Dr. Dongho Kim

In this course, students will acquire an understanding of the theories and practices involved in international business. Topics include: the nature and patterns of international business; economic, socio-cultural, political, legal and labor issues; the role of international organizations; the international monetary system; theories of trade, investment and economic development; operational and strategic management issues related to business with foreign nations; and the significance of international trade agreements. Prerequisites: Principles of Management or Introduction to Business or equivalent required; Macroeconomics highly recommended. This is an upper level course requiring advanced level writing and analytical skills. To fully benefit from the course students should take it in the final half of their degree program.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements? 
no

CHFS 4020 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Heidi Nightengale

This course explores the conditions and circumstances that place young people at risk. Students will examine the position of youth at risk in their own communities and propose policies and programs, as well as prevention and intervention strategies aimed at supporting and protecting at-risk youth.  This course aligns with the Community and Human Services area of study guidelines for Knowledge of Human Behavior, Skills, and Diversity.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

CHFS 1005 introductory, liberal
instructor: Sara Farmer

This course is an overview of the science of family development, covering major theories and developmental frameworks. This course emphasizes important social contexts that influence family processes, including variations in family structures/functions, and social, psychological, and historical variables that influence familial experiences. Strategies used in helping professions promote and support optimal family functioning and career opportunities for marriage and family professionals are also explored. Note: This course is aligned with the Community and Human Services Area of Study guidelines for Knowledge of Human Behavior and Diversity.

Meets Gen Ed requirements? 
no

PHOT 2015 introductory, liberal
Instructor: Alan Stankiewicz

This introductory study is designed for students who want to learn how to use a digital camera to capture, edit, and manipulate photographic images. This study is intended for the student who has working knowledge of the basics of either the Windows or Mac operating system, as well as having a basic knowledge of traditional photography (or equivalent experience). This plan will be implemented by reviewing principles of composition; discussing and practicing various styles of photography; learning to use appropriate digital photographic editing software, and, finally, how to prepare the final images for various means of display, from hard copy printing to digital display.

 

Meets Gen Ed requirements?
yes, Arts

ACCT 2005 introductory, non-liberal
Instructor: Valerie Goodwin

The objective of this study is to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of financial accounting systems and principles, including financial statements preparation, interpretation and communication to external parties and managers. Among topics covered are: the accounting cycle for gathering, recording, summarizing, reporting and analyzing of accounting data. The course includes an overview of accounting for assets, liabilities, stockholders' equity, revenues and expenses including cash, investments, accounts receivable, inventories, plant assets and equipment, intangible assets and natural resources, short and long term liabilities, in addition to basic principles of internal control and the role of ethics in accounting profession. This course covers professional ethics and social responsibility in business. Students cannot count the credit for Accounting for Decision Makers in their degree plan if they also take Introductory Accounting 1 'Financial' and/or Introductory Accounting 2 'Managerial', since the course contents are similar. The course satisfies quantitative aspects of business.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements? 
no

ACCT 2010 introductory, non-liberal
Instructor: Valerie Goodwin

The course is designed to expand on the knowledge gained of financial accounting theory, accounting information systems cycles and concepts by focusing more in depth on the manufacturing environment and the use of accounting information for planning, controlling, and decision-making internally by the management and externally by other interested parties. It covers specialized financial reporting issues such as preparing, interpreting and using the statement of cash flows, financial statements analysis and budgeting, long and short-term financial investment and production decisions and other cost analysis concepts including incremental cost analysis, cost-volume-profit analysis techniques and incorporating the time value impact on financial and managerial decisions. This course covers professional ethics and social responsibility in business. Prerequisites: Introductory Accounting 1 or equivalent The course content is similar to, and more comprehensive than, Accounting for Decision Makers. Therefore, students cannot count the credit for both of these courses in their degree plan. The course satisfies quantitative aspects of business.

Meets Gen Ed requirements?
no

MGMT 3025 advanced, non-liberal
Instructor: Hartley Hutchins

This study explores the theory and practice of effective leadership. Some of the topics students will explore include leadership theories, the nature of managing and leading, behavioral indicators of leadership and the complex nature of power and influence within organizations This course was previously BME-214624 Managerial Leadership.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

MGMT 3040 advanced, non-liberal
Instructor: Dr. Luis Camacho

This advanced management study, which is open to all students and is also part of the Business and Environmental Sustainability Certificate, focuses on strategic planning and managing sustainable business operations. The student will become acquainted with skills needed to understand the role of management in the context of sustainability, will explore ways to incorporate sustainability strategies through industry analysis, competitive advantage and SWOT analysis. The study also involves mastering leadership concepts such as managing change, organizational culture, and corporate social responsibility. Students will learn strategies to employ as change agents, will create a toolbox of best practices to lead change, and master analytic tools they can use to assess success in creating sustainable organizations. Prerequisites: Principles of Management or equivalent; Economics and/or Finance or equivalent. Students should not take this course and Sustainable Enterprise Management.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

MGMT 3045 advanced, non-liberal
Instructor: Dr. Christopher Whann

The course in not-for-profit management explores the unique nature of these organizations and the management skills required. Concepts and theories applicable to this field, often referred to as the nonprofit sector, will be examined. There is a focus on key organizational and management characteristics, such as the mission, governance, leadership, funding and financial management, organizational dynamics, human resources, strategic management, advocacy, and social entrepreneurship. Included will be the development of an understanding of the challenges of managing an organization that is comprised of a mix of paid staff and volunteers. An exploration of current trends and challenges facing today’s not-for-profit organizational managers will be included.

Prerequisite: (must complete before registering): Principles of Management (MGMT 1005), or equivalent
 
 
Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

 

MGMT 1005 introductory, non-liberal
Instructor: Dr. Margaret Sithole

This study is designed to introduce students to basic principles and functions of Management in an organizational setting including decision-making, planning, organizing, staffing, leading and controlling. The roles and functions of managers are examined within the context of organizational structure, cultural diversity, teamwork, ethics and global challenges.

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

ARTS 4127 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Alan Stankiewicz

Retail Marketing and Design is a course of study focusing on the current American esthetics found in the commercial market place. This study will look at the areas of marketing and design such as clientele, competition, merchandising, and production, all of which informs the design process within the corporate structure A working knowledge of design is not a requirement for this course of study.

Meets Gen Ed requirements?
yes, Arts

HUSV 3068 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Heidi Nightengale

The purpose of this study is to gain a working knowledge of social welfare policies in the United States focusing on both the historical and current context. Emphasis will be placed on connecting policy with practice. This course is aligned with the Community and Human Services Area of Study guidelines for Knowledge of Service Delivery and Skills.

Prerequisites: Intro to Human Services is recommended

Meets SUNY General Education requirements?
no

MGMT 4035 advanced, non-liberal
Instructor: Hartley Hutchins

This course is a capstone study for Business, Management & Economics students. It introduces the key concepts, tools, and principles of strategy formulation and competitive analysis. It is concerned with managerial decisions and actions that affect the performance and survival of business enterprises. The course is focused on the information, analyses, organizational processes, and skills and business judgment managers must use to devise strategies, position their businesses, define firm boundaries and maximize long-term profits in the face of uncertainty and competition. In studying strategy, the course draws together and builds on all the ideas, concepts, and theories from your functional courses such as Accounting, Economics, Finance, Marketing, Management, Organizational Behavior, and Statistics.

Prerequisites: All of the core BM&E courses e.g. Management, Organizational Behavior, Accounting, Economics, Statistics, Marketing, Finance. The assumption is that students enrolling in Strategic Management are in their last enrollment and have successfully completed most of the BM&E requisite courses.
 

Meets Gen Ed requirements?
no

HUSV 3070 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Sara Farmer

The purpose of this study is to learn about supervision in human services. Topics may include: definitions of supervision; organizational and workgroup culture; facilitating groups and teams; recruitment and screening of employees; designing and conducting worker performance appraisal; and value-based principles and laws guiding personnel management. This course is aligned with the Community and Human Services Area of Study guidelines for Skills and Application and Integration.

Meets Gen Ed requirements?
no

CHFS 4035 advanced, liberal
Instructor: Sara Farmer

The study will introduce students to trauma theory, practice, and stages of recovery as related to work with adults. The study addresses the experiences of people who have suffered traumas like sexual and/or domestic violence, combat, and political terror. Students will explore treatment strategies that may include working with groups, individual, and families. This study will emphasize self-awareness and boundaries and introduce students to concepts of vicarious trauma and self-care. This course aligns with the Community and Human Services area of study guidelines for Knowledge of Human Behavior, Knowledge of Service Delivery, and Skills. Note: This study will not cover childhood trauma. Please see: Childhood Trauma: Theory, Treatment and Recovery for further study.  

Meets Gen Ed requirements?
no

For Further Information Contact:

Lori McCaffrey
Collegewide Residency Coordinator

Lori.McCaffrey@esc.edu