It’s Time to Apply for Spring Term

Our Spring 2 undergraduate application deadline is right around the corner.

Apply by January 28, so you can register for courses by March 4. Spring 2 term is an accelerated 8 week session that begins March 7 and ends April 29.

Review our Spring 2 undergraduate courses below. Maximum registration for this accelerated term is 8 credits.

Important:
If you plan to use financial aid for Spring 2 Term, you must register for courses by February 15 in order secure your seat and payment.

Learn more.

ACCT 2010

Introductory Accounting II

The course is designed to expand on the knowledge gained of financial accounting theory, accounting information systems cycles and concepts by focusing more in depth on the manufacturing environment and the use of accounting information for planning, controlling, and decision-making internally by the management and externally by other interested parties. It covers specialized financial reporting issues such as preparing, interpreting and using the statement of cash flows, financial statements analysis and budgeting, long and short-term financial investment and production decisions and other cost analysis concepts including incremental cost analysis, cost-volume-profit analysis techniques and incorporating the time value impact on financial and managerial decisions. This course covers professional ethics and social responsibility in business.

Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Introductory Accounting I: Financial Accounting (ACCT 2005), or equivalent.

Notes: The course content is similar to, and more comprehensive than, Accounting for Decision Makers (ACCT 1005). Therefore, students cannot count the credit for both of these courses in their degree plan. The course satisfies quantitative aspects of business.

This course was previously BME-212064 Introductory Accounting 2.

ANTH 1010

Intro to Cultural Anthropology

This course introduces students to the concepts, contributions, and methods of cultural anthropology, stressing the insights they offer into contemporary social issues, both in the US and abroad. The study examines the holistic perspective that anthropologists use in their discipline which is based primarily on the participant observation research method. The student will explore a variety of human societies and cultures around the world. Topics may include: kinship and social organization; beliefs, ritual, and religious systems; family and marriage; political and economic systems; science, technology, and digital ethnography; and systems of social stratification (race, ethnicity, gender, etc.).

This course was previously SOC-282224  Introduction to Cultural Anthropology.

ANTH 4010

Art History: Study of Cultures

This course is designed for students to gain concepts and skills for constructing a lens on art history. Students will learn to connect artistic practices not only with questions of aesthetic trends but also with the shifts of time, sociocultural context, and art historical methods. Specifically, students will study a range of approaches employed by art historians and apply them as they analyze and interpret visual artworks and critical cultural issues in art history. This course was previously ART-223514 Art History: A Study of Cultures.

Prerequisites: upper-level standing with advanced level academic skills. A lower-level art history class is highly recommended.

ANTH 4011

Art-based Research Practice

Through studying the concepts of arts-based research and samples from the visual, performing, narrative, and media arts, students learn to design and carry out arts-based research projects that combine artmaking activities in social research contexts. Specifically, students survey various research methods, tools, and resources appropriate to their arts disciplines and individual projects. Sample research practice might begin with a question emerged from artistic practice, employ artmaking as a part of research process, or consider research as an artistic practice.

BIOL 1004

Human Nutrition

This course provides an introduction to the theories, principles, and concepts underlying the use of nutrients by the human body. The topics covered include micro and macronutrients; the digestive tract; nutrient digestion, absorption, and metabolism; energy balance; the relationship of the diet to fitness, health, and life span; and essentials of food and diet analysis.

Note: This course does not meet the guidelines for Biology concentrations.

This course was previously SMT-272354 Human Nutrition.

BIOL 1213

Biology II Laboratory

This is a one-credit laboratory course that supports the Biology II course. Students will learn basic knowledge of microbiology and plant and animal biology through laboratory exercises. Dissection techniques are explained and used to compare a variety of life forms and their internal anatomy. Laboratory topics include: the biological diversity of bacteria, archaea, protists, and fungi; plant form and function; and animal form and function. Life forms are compared and contrasted in the context of the principles of evolutionary adaptation. This laboratory course complements the lecture component covered in Biology II, but it is not a co-requisite to the lecture.

Prerequisites: Biology I or Introduction to Cell Biology and Genetics, or equivalent.

BIOL 1313

Anat & Phys II: Laboratory

This is a one-credit laboratory course that supports the Anatomy and Physiology II course. Students will learn basic knowledge of the general principles of Anatomy and Physiology through laboratory exercises. Students will practice dissection and laboratory techniques using laboratory equipment and preserved specimens. This laboratory course complements the lecture component covered in Anatomy and Physiology II, but it is not a co-requisite to the lecture. Note: This course is intended for students in health-related concentrations.

Prerequisites: BIOL 1300 or BIOL 1304 or BIOL 1310 or BIOL 1311 or equivalent.

BIOL 2204

Ethnobotany

Our human ancestors depended on plants for food, shelter, medicine, and clothing. Plants also had a key role in religion and mythology. Knowledge of plants and their uses was vital for survival for early peoples, and many cultures today still depend on plants for many of their resources. In this course, students will learn about plant biology and the role of plants in societies throughout the world. Ethnobotanical field methods will be introduced and students will engage in field/practical activities. Other topics for exploration and discussion will include conservation, sustainable development, bioprospecting, and intellectual property rights.

This course was previously SMT-272054 Ethnobotany.

BIOL 2221

Microbiology Laboratory

This is a one-credit laboratory course that supports the Microbiology course. Students will learn basic knowledge of Microbiology through laboratory exercises. This laboratory course complements the lecture component covered in Microbiology, but it is not a co-requisite to the lecture.

Prerequsites: Biology I with Lab (BIOL 1200) or Introduction to Cell Biology and Genetics (BIOL 1204), or equivalent, and Biology II with Lab (BIOL 1201) or Introduction to Population Biology (BIOL 1206), or equivalent.

BIOL 3204

Genetics

This advanced level course explores the field of genetics. It expands on topics covered in introductory biology courses and extends prior knowledge of molecular genetics and the basic principles of heredity. The course emphasizes the importance of the scientific method, and investigates techniques used by scientists to unravel the intricacies of genetics. Topics include the history of genetics, Mendelian genetic principles, quantitative genetics, chromosome structure and mapping, mutations, gene expression, and current genetic biotechnologies. Students will learn the underlying principles behind modern genetics laboratory techniques and discuss the ethical ramifications of recent breakthroughs in genetic research.

Prerequisites (must complete before registering): Biology I with Lab (BIOL 1200) or Introduction to Cell Biology and Genetics (BIOL 1204), or equivalent and Biology II with Lab (BIOL 1201) or the two-term sequence: Introduction to Organismal Biology (BIOL 1205) and Introduction to Population Biology(BIOL 1206), or equivalent

Note: This course meets the guidelines for Biology concentrations.

This course was previously SMT-273384 Genetics.

BUSN 1015

Introduction to Business

This course is designed to serve generally as a first business class to be taken by students in business and related concentrations. Its main objective is to provide a brief overview of the basic concepts and principles of contemporary business topics such as business ethics, economics, e-business, management, marketing, accounting, and finance.

BUSN 3010

Business Ethics

This study is designed to facilitate an understanding of philosophy of ethics and ethical decision-making process. The study emphasizes the overall philosophies, theories, and concepts of moral reasoning in making informed ethical decisions in various areas of business and business management.

Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Principles of Management (MGMT 1005), or equivalent.

This course was previously BME-214754.

CHEM 1211

Chemistry I Laboratory

This is a one-credit laboratory course that supports the Chemistry II course. Students will learn basic knowledge of the general principles of chemistry through laboratory exercises. Students will practice laboratory techniques using chemical laboratory equipment. This laboratory course complements the lecture component covered in Chemistry II, but it is not a co-requisite to the lecture.

Chemistry I with Lab, General Chemistry I, or equivalent.

CHFS 3022

Counseling Children & Adol

In this study students will explore the various theories, models, and treatment approaches for working with children and adolescents who are in need of counseling. Students will learn techniques that helping professionals use for assessment, engagement, and intervention. An important part of this study is examining counseling children and adolescents in various social and cultural contexts. This course aligns with the Community and Human Services area of study guidelines for Knowledge of Human Behavior, Skills, and Application and Integration.

Course previously CHS-253414.

HUSV 3122

Conflict in Human Services

The student will explore theory related to conflict, mediation and negotiation and how it may be applied to the human service setting. The student will learn more about specific approaches useful for one-on-one to helping situations as well as strategies for understanding and managing conflict in the organizational setting. The student will consider his or her own conflict style and learn how to assess conflict. The student will do research on a specific area of interest (e.g. transformative mediation) related to a resolution process. This course is aligned with the Community and Human Services area of study guidelines for skills.

DIGA 1010

Digital Art & Design: Intro

In this course, students learn advanced digital art and design using the following Adobe Creative Suite applications: Photoshop Extended, Illustrator, InDesign, Flash, Dreamweaver, Fireworks & Bridge. They develop expertise in working with bitmap and vector images. Through creative exercises, projects, individual and group critiques, portfolio development and evaluation, research, and written assignments, students develop effective visual communication skills, strengthen individual artistic style, and demonstrate a sophisticated, professional understanding of technical and creative processes inherent in digital art. This course is for advanced-level students with previous knowledge of Adobe Photoshop and the prior skills needed to learn advanced digital art techniques.

Prerequisites: An introductory level digital art course. OS Platform: PC or Mac, Software: Adobe Creative Suite and an introductory level digital art course. Introductory level knowledge of Adobe Photoshop.

This course was previously ART-224444 Digital Art and Design: Advanced.

DIGA 3040

Digital Storytelling

Digital Storytelling combines storytelling arts with social, mobile, and digital media technologies. Learn to apply digital storytelling theory and techniques to write, produce and publish digital stories, including autobiographical narratives, mobile stories, and a collaborative digital story. Consider ethical issues such as intellectual property, privacy protection and the rights of storytelling subjects. In this course, you’ll generate story ideas, develop narrative structures for digital stories, and provide scripts and scene descriptions. Selecting different digital tools, you’ll integrate images, text, video and audio to create digital stories, and acquire competency in the use of digital media applications. They will be expected to research and select digital applications, create accounts to access free or low cost tools, and use tutorials and other digital resources to learn them. Ideally digital media arts or digital art and design students take Digital Storytelling before Media Arts.

This course was previously ART-223054 Digital Storytelling. Students taking the course must have access to digital devices (such as a desktop computer, laptop, tablet or smartphone, headset or USB microphone) allowing them to take photographs, record audio and video, edit digital assets within the applications of their choice, and upload these to their story blog or the course.

ECON 2015

Macroeconomics


This course provides a comprehensive overview of macroeconomic issues. The determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation are studied. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed. Important policy debates such as, the sub-prime crisis, social security, the public debt, and international economic issues are critically explored. The course introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles with the experience of the U.S. and foreign economies.

Corequisites: Microeconomics (ECON_2020)

Notes : Macroeconomics focuses on the working of the overall economy whereas Microeconomics emphasizes the behavior of individual actors, such as firms and households, under various constraints. This 4-credit Macroeconomics course covers a broader array of macroeconomic topics than are included in the 4 and 6 credit courses that cover both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Intermediate Macroeconomics provides a deeper analysis of different macroeconomic models. International Finance provides a focus on the international aspects of the economic system, whilst Money & Banking involves a more detailed examination of the role of the banking system and money creation in a modern economy. Other specialized courses may examine the functioning of specific sectors as well as the gender and environmental aspects of environmental decision making.

This course was previously BME-212214 Economics/Macro.

EDST 1005

Introduction to Teaching

This course will introduce students to the profession of teaching and education. Students will be encouraged to think more deeply, more broadly, and more systematically about the role of teachers and explore teaching practices, various contexts of teaching and learning, as well as contemporary issues that relate to the teaching profession.

EDST 3040

Learning Styles

The purpose of the course is for the learner to understand how diverse learning styles impact the life of others as well as their own life. The concept 'learning styles' is a broad frame within which to include diverse paradigms for different ways of knowing. Learners will analyze learning style concepts from Western, Eastern, and Indigenous learning styles as well as learning styles within different learning contexts.

Please note: This course does not meet the area of study guideline for learning theories.

Please note: This course may be used for educational planning credit with mentor approval.

This course was previously EDU-233222 Learning Styles.

EDST 3050

Reflective Learning

This course will help students better understand how adults learn and the importance of reflection to the learning process. Students will review traditional learning theory (Knowles) and contemporary learning theory (Zull) that investigate the importance of self-reflection, the social nature of learning, biological bases for learning, and emotional aspects of learning. The purpose of the course is to enable students to both learn about learning and apply concepts to become more aware of themselves as learners (and thus more able to direct their own learning).

Please note: This course may be used for educational planning credit with mentor approval.

This course was previously EDU-233022 Reflective Learning.

EDST 3123

Autism Spectrum Disorder in Ed

This course offers a practical approach to understanding Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) including assessment and progress monitoring, and a variety of practices that support inclusion of children in classroom environments. Students will review both theory and evidence-based practices as the foundation for success when working with young children with ASD, including the principles of mainstreaming, inclusion, individualized educations program (IEP), and Positive Behavioral Intervention Supports (PBIS).

HLAD 2010

United States Health Systems

This course will study the origins, changes and current status of the major programs that provide for the delivery, financing and regulation of healthcare services in the public and private sectors of the United States.

HLHS 3015

Grief & Loss

This course explores the processes of loss and grief, various types of loss, including the experiences of those who have lost loved ones. Theories and research on the grieving process will be a focus of the course, and other topics may include: the roles of ritual, faith, and remembrance in grieving; cultural factors that contribute to reactions to loss; determining when grief becomes dysfunctional; and effective strategies for intervening with an individual who has experienced a significant loss.

Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 1005) or Introduction to Human Services (LABR 1165), or equivalent

Note: This course is aligned with the Community and Human Services area of study guidelines for Knowledge of Human Behavior and Skills.

This course was previously CHS-254044 Grief and Loss.

HIST 1115

Western Civilization I

This study explores the ideas and institutions that arose from the ancient and medieval worlds, e.g. philosophy, law, and Christianity, that lay the foundations of western society. In addition, the study examines the development of the west in the context of world affairs. Finally, this study provides students with an introduction to the meaning of history and aspects of the historical process.

HIST 2030

US History 1865 to Present

In 1865, the United States was in tatters. Civil War had divided the nation into two, and even after the war ended, deep rifts remained between whites and blacks, immigrants and 'natives,' and the descendants of European settlers and indigenous Americans. The meaning of a simple word - freedom - lies at the core of these rifts and that word will guide our study. The course begins with a look at how the meaning of freedom changed in the Reconstruction era before moving into an exploration of America’s westward and overseas expansion in the late 19th century, the economic booms and busts of the period between the two world wars, the social upheavals of the civil rights movements of the 1960s, and the conservative turn of the post-Reagan era.

This course was previously HIS-241224 U.S. History From 1865 to the Present.

HIST 3345

Modern American History

Modern American History is a survey course, which covers events in American history from Reconstruction in the south in 1877 through the present. Students will examine various political, social and cultural themes in this course, including Reconstruction, western settlement and the frontier, industrialization, immigration, American imperialism and world power, the Progressive movement, WW I, the Roaring Twenties, the Depression, the New Deal, WW II, the Cold War and Nuclear Age, the 1950s, Civil Rights, the 1960s, Vietnam, and the resurgence of conservatism in the 1980s. Critical reading skills and the ability to analyze and evaluate primary and secondary historical sources and produce written interpretations will be emphasized.

This course was previously HIS-243214 Modern American History.

HUDV 1015

Human Development: Intro

In this course the student will examine a variety of theoretical viewpoints on human developmental process, as well as current research and studies of the principal topics of developmental psychology. Topics covered in this study may include: the impact on development of the continuing interaction between genetic and environmental factors, the growing body of knowledge about how children learn language and develop cognitive and social skills, and a discussion of prominent theorists in the field. Additionally lifespan theories like Erikson and Levinson may be emphasized, and focus on stages of adult development will be included, in addition to death and dying potentially being covered.

Please note: Students are advised to consult with their mentor prior to enrolling in an introductory and an advanced level of the same or similar course title (e.g. Human Development: Introductory and Human Development: Advanced) as there can be significant redundancy in the content of developmental courses.

This course was previously HDV-282174 Human Development: Intro.

HUDV 3055

Developmental Neurobiology

This course looks at the interaction between the development of internal (neurological) and external (behavior) processes across the lifespan. Topics may include how brain development and the environment interact, how the brain changes throughout development, and how the brain and behavior are related at different points throughout the lifespan. The study will include how the development of the neurological system reflects individual variation in development at different stages in the lifecycle.

While not required, it might be helpful if students had Human Development, Human Biology, or equivalent courses.

This course was previously HDV-283112.

INFS 1000

Computer Applications

Computer Applications study is designed to educate students to use computers effectively for business and personal applications. Its problem-solving feature prepares the student to analyze data, to develop critical thinking, and to discover effective solutions in real-life situations and in business problems. Students would gain competence in learning new software packages--a critical skill for future employment in this world of changing software. The study includes general concepts of Microsoft Office, and concentrates on the learning of word processing, spreadsheets, database and presentation graphics using the Microsoft Office suite.

Highly Recommended (not required): Basic familiarity with computers is helpful, but no previous study of computers is assumed.

Notes: Requires an IBM compatible computer (Apple machines are not supported). Students must have access to the Microsoft Office Suite (including Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint) for use in the course. Students must also purchase the textbook that corresponds to the Microsoft Office software they will use to complete the course.

This course was previously SMT-271454 Computer Applications.

 

INFS 1001

Computer Applications for Presentations

Computer Applications for Presentations study is designed to educate students to use computers effectively for business and personal applications. Its problem-solving feature prepares the student to analyze data, to develop critical thinking, and to discover effective solutions in real-life situations and in business problems. Students would gain competence in learning new software packages--a critical skill for future employment in this world of changing software. The study includes general concepts of office suite and concentrates on the learning of word processing and presentation graphics applications. Basic familiarity with computers is helpful, but no previous study of computers is assumed. This course requires an IBM compatible computer (Apple machines are not supported). Students must have access to the Microsoft Office Suite for use in the course.

If students have already taken INFS 1000 Computer Applications or equivalent, they should not register for Computer Applications for Presentations.

 

INFS 1001

Computer Applications for Presentations

Computer Applications for Data Processing study is designed to educate students to use computers effectively for business and personal applications. Its problem-solving feature prepares the student to analyze data, to develop critical thinking, and to discover effective solutions in real-life situations and in business problems. Students would gain competence in learning new software packages--a critical skill for future employment in this world of changing software. The study includes general concepts of office suite and concentrates on the learning of spreadsheets and database applications. Basic familiarity with computers is helpful, but no previous study of computers is assumed. This course requires an IBM compatible computer (Apple machines are not supported). Students must have access to the Microsoft Office Suite for use in the course.

If students have already taken INFS 1000 Computer Applications or equivalent, they should not register for Computer Applications for Data Processing.

MGMT 1005

Principles of Management

This study is designed to introduce students to basic principles and functions of Management in an organizational setting including decision-making, planning, organizing, staffing, leading and controlling. The roles and functions of managers are examined within the context of organizational structure, cultural diversity, teamwork, ethics and global challenges.

This course was previously BME-212314 Management Principles.

MGMT 3040

Managing Sustainable Organizations

This advanced management study, which is open to all students and is also part of the Business and Environmental Sustainability Certificate, focuses on strategic planning and managing sustainable business operations. The student will become acquainted with skills needed to understand the role of management in the context of sustainability, will explore ways to incorporate sustainability strategies through industry analysis, competitive advantage and SWOT analysis. The study also involves mastering leadership concepts such as managing change, organizational culture, and corporate social responsibility. Students will learn strategies to employ as change agents, will create a toolbox of best practices to lead change, and master analytic tools they can use to assess success in creating sustainable organizations.

Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Principles of Management (MGMT 1005) or equivalent and Economics and/or Finance or equivalent.

Students should not take this course and Sustainable Enterprise Management.

MATH 1030

Visualizing Mathematics

Are you a visual learner? This course will give an opportunity to learn mathematics primarily through seeing it. Focus will be on topics in geometry, which are naturally visual, and graphing, which will give an understanding of the visual aspect of algebra. The course will also look at mathematics through art. DVDs and text materials will be used, along with internet resources.
Note: This study is appropriate for students who need general education credit in mathematics.

This course was previously SMT-271514 Visualizing Mathematics.

 

MATH 1040

Algebra

This study will develop basic algebra concepts and problem solving techniques. The student will develop skills in translating problem situations into their symbolic representations and manipulating those symbols. Major topics include equations, inequalities, problem solving, geometry, graphs, and transformations. Linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions will be studied.

Note: This study is appropriate for students who need general education credit in mathematics.

Prerequisite: Understanding of arithmetic essentials.

This course was previously SMT-271104 Algebra.

 

MATH 1050

Mathematics for Business

Mathematics for Business presents math skills and knowledge that can be applied in solving financial problems. The core topics include business finance, trade and cash discounts, markup and markdown, business statistics, wages and payroll, simple interest and simple discount, compound interest, future value, and present value, mortgages, sinking funds, and amortization, depreciation, inventory, insurance, business insurance, life insurance, annuities, taxes, stocks and bonds. Students will also gain an understanding of financial instruments and terminology used in business finance. This serves as a foundation for further studies in business, management, accounting, and finance. Students will gain skills to manage personal finance.

Note: This study is appropriate for students who need general education credit in mathematics.

 

MATH 1065

Statistics

The focus of this course is on the application and use of statistics, rather than the detailed complexity of the underlying mathematics. Students will study and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of data analysis, including both descriptive and inferential statistics, including arranging data, tables and graphs, measures of central tendency and dispersion, regression analysis, correlation, sampling, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The student will make use of technology-based tools (Excel, StatCrunch, etc.) to assist in summarizing, interpreting, and communicating with data.

Notes: This study is appropriate for students who need general education credit in mathematics.

Algebra would provide a good background for statistics, although the minimum entering skills would be arithmetic essentials (fractions, decimals, ratios) and graphing.

This course was previously SMT-272384 Statistics: An Activity Based Approach.

MUSC 1005

Exploring the World of Music

This introductory course in music appreciation considers how people engage in music-making activities in various cultures. Students will learn to interpret and write about music using terms and concepts from assigned readings, and they will learn to articulate their understanding of particular musical phenomena (pieces, styles, composers or performers, instruments, performance venues, recording technologies, etc.) in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Students will learn to interpret one or more aspects of music-making as artistic or as creative process. Student will have ample opportunity to shape and direct the focus of their learning according to their own interests and purposes.

This course was previously ART-221514 Exploring the World of Music.

 

MUSC 3010

American Music, American Life

From disco to country, hip-hop to jazz, classical to gospel, Americans have adopted, adapted, appropriated, developed, and invented many musical traditions, genres, and institutions. In this course, students will sample some of the vast diversity of American music. Each student will also explore in some depth a particular area of American music of their own interest (such as an artist, genre, performance, practice, or issue). This course was previously ART-223414 American Popular Music in the Twentieth Century.

Prerequisites: advanced level reading, writing and research skills

PHYS 1212

Physics II

Physics II is the second course of a two-term sequence in general Physics for science concentrations. This three-credit course covers the lecture and not the laboratory component of the sequence, which is offered as a separate course. Students will explore electromagnetism, thermal physics, and quantum physics using an algebra-based framework. Topics covered will include heat and temperature; phases and phase changes; laws of thermodynamics; electric charges, forces, and fields; electric potential; electric current and direct-current circuits; magnetism; electromagnetic waves; geometric optics; physical optics; quantum physics; atomic and nuclear physics.

Prerequisites: PHYS 1310 Physics I or equivalent.

PHYS 1213

Physics II Lab

This is a one-credit laboratory course that supports the Physics II course. Students will learn basic knowledge of the general principles of Physics through laboratory exercises. Students will practice laboratory techniques using laboratory equipment.

Prerequisites: Physics I or equivalent; and Physics II or equivalent. Corequisites: Physics II or equivalent.

PSYC 1005

Introduction to Psychology

The purpose of this course is to gain an overview and examine the various disciplines, core concepts, and theories of psychology. The course will examine the basic concepts of psychology as a social science. Students will examine the major ideas/theories/disciplines within psychology, such as research methods, sensation/perception, memory, theories of personality, psychological disorders, social psychology, and others. Throughout this course, an emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of psychology as a science of human thought and behavior.

This course was previously HDV-282164.

PSYC 2050

Stress and Coping

This course covers the study of stress and its influence on health and well-being. Topics may include theories of stress; emotional, cognitive, and behavioral symptoms of stress; negative and positive stress; personal stressors; the influence of attitudes and beliefs on the experience of stress; personality and stress; specific types of stress, like job, family, and technology stress; and theory and research related to effectively coping with stress. Students will have an opportunity to consider personal stressors and coping, as well as how to assist others to better cope with stress.

PSYC 3020

Social Psychology: Adv

This course includes a comprehensive overview of the research methods, concepts, and theories related to social psychology, the study of how individuals interact within their social environment. The purpose of this study is to gain an in-depth understanding of the various influences that people and social settings have upon the beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors of others. Significant social phenomena will be explored, along with major theoretical concepts and research within this field. Topics might include conformity, obedience, collective/group behavior, media/persuasion, prejudice, and discrimination. Please note: Students are advised to consult with their mentor prior to enrolling in an introductory and an advanced level of the same or similar course title (e.g. Human Development: Introductory and Human Development: Advanced) as there can be significant redundancy in the content of courses.

While it is not required, it might be helpful if students have taken Introduction to Psychology or an equivalent course.

Before taking this course, students should have an understanding of the field of psychology as a science with specific methodologies; some basic knowledge of psychological theories/concepts/history.

PSYC 3055

Cultural Psychology

Cultural psychology is the comparative study of cultural effects on human psychology. It examines psychological diversity and the links between cultural norms and behavior. It will examine the ways in which particular human activities are influenced by social and cultural forces. Students can expect to develop a broader, global perception of contemporary psychology. Activities are intended to explain current psychological knowledge and its applications from a cross-cultural perspective. Additionally, this course will assist in developing a useful set of critical-thinking tools with which to analyze and evaluate psychology from various cultural perspectives.

While it is not required, it might be helpful if students have taken Introduction to Psychology or an equivalent course.

This course was previously HDV-283544.

PSYC 3065

Ethical Issues in Psychology

This course will explore to the role of ethics in psychological practice and psychological science. Students will learn to integrate ethical principles with their own morals and values in hypothetical professional situations. There will be a focus on ethical decision making in the domains of clinical practice, teaching, and research.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology or equivalent.

PSYC 4030

Media Psychology

This course engages a comprehensive look at the foundations, history, methodology, and contemporary issues facing the field of media psychology. Topics may include violence and sexuality, ethnic portrayals, and persuasion, as well as current research on the areas of parasocial theory, social media, and the effects of media on development. Differing uses and effects throughout the lifespan are discussed with a recognition that media plays a different role in childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and for the aging adult. An emphasis in media across cultures is included.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology or equivalent.

SPAN 1010

Intro Spanish: Language & Cult

 

Introductory Spanish: Language and Culture is designed for students who have no previous Spanish instruction. This course introduces students to the Spanish language, but the emphasis is on the studies of the cultures of the Spanish- speaking world. Language learning in this course will focus on understanding and learning to speak simple phrases, learning limited vocabulary and very basic grammatical structures. All language skills will be practiced: listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course also introduces students to the Spanish-speaking cultures of Spain, Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean and South America. Students will learn similarities and differences in values, attitudes and actions as they investigate different cultures through a wide variety of resources (e.g., online resources, texts, videos). Students will also investigate specific topics related to cultural experiences (e.g., ecotourism in Costa Rica, indigenous cultures in Guatemala). Students should be available for oral practices at least once a week. Special accommodations will be made for army students.

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

There is no overlap with Spanish 1

This course was previously CUL-221294 Introductory Spanish: Language and Culture.

 

COMW 1005

College Writing

College writing focuses on the basics of academic writing: writing processes, essays, research skills. Students will write and evaluate thesis statements for essays, and learn how to develop the thesis idea with supporting details. Students will learn how to structure ideas and information in essays. Students will learn how to research, incorporate, and document sources to support a thesis argument. Additionally, students will develop proficiency in oral discourse through discussion of essays and college writing skills.

This course was previously CUL-221624 College Writing. Depending on their goals and needs, students may take any of five different, introductory, college writing courses: (COMW 1005), (COMW 1015), (COMW 1010), (COMW 2005), or (COMW 2020). Although all of these courses deal with similar skills and knowledge (writing process, thesis, support, documentation), they have different emphases. Note that, according to college policy, students can include up to 8 introductory-level expository/college writing credits in their ESC degree.

COMW 3122

Proposal Writing

Develop analytical, research, and writing skills at the upper level. Proposal Writing offers a way of honing these skills in a concrete, real-world context. Students will read and analyze sample proposals and build on basic communication theory to learn what constitutes appropriate proposal content and format. Students will learn how to find, use, and evaluate the quality of evidence to logically support their proposal ideas. Students will write a short academic proposal and two longer, formal, work- or community-related proposals. They will share and provide feedback on drafts as part of learning how to analyze a proposal’s effectiveness.

Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Ability to do advanced-level work

Notes: Students cannot take both versions of the course. This course may be used for educational planning credit with mentor approval.

This course was previously CUL-233052 Proposal Writing (2cr).